Aging, Longevity and Health in the News


Nature: Current issue

China launches brain-imaging factory
by David Cyranoski
16 Aug 2017 at 12:00am
Hub aims to make industrial-scale high-resolution brain mapping a standard tool for neuroscience
Cell biology: Healthy skin rejects cancer
by Joseph BurclaffJason C. Mills
2 Aug 2017 at 12:00am
Live imaging shows that healthy skin cells surround and expel neighbours that have cancer-promoting mutations, revealing that tissues can recognize and eliminate mutant cells to prevent tumour initiation. See Letter p.334
New gliding mammaliaforms from the Jurassic
by Qing-Jin MengDavid M. GrossnickleDi LiuYu-Guang ZhangApril I. NeanderQiang JiZhe-Xi Luo
9 Aug 2017 at 12:00am
Stem mammaliaforms are Mesozoic forerunners to mammals, and they offer critical evidence for the anatomical evolution and ecological diversification during the earliest mammalian history. Two new eleutherodonts from the Late Jurassic period have skin membranes and skeletal features that are adapted ...
Vigorous atmospheric motion in the red supergiant star Antares
by K. OhnakaG. WeigeltK.-H. Hofmann
16 Aug 2017 at 12:00am
Red supergiant stars represent a late stage of the evolution of stars more massive than about nine solar masses, in which they develop complex, multi-component atmospheres. Bright spots have been detected in the atmosphere of red supergiants using interferometric imaging. Above the photosphere of a ...
Correction of aberrant growth preserves tissue homeostasis
by Samara BrownCristiana M. PinedaTianchi XinJonathan BoucherKathleen C. SuozziSangbum ParkCatherine Matte-MartoneDavid G. GonzalezJulie RytlewskiSlobodan BeronjaValentina Greco
2 Aug 2017 at 12:00am
Cells in healthy tissues acquire mutations with surprising frequency. Many of these mutations are associated with abnormal cellular behaviours such as differentiation defects and hyperproliferation, yet fail to produce macroscopically detectable phenotypes. It is currently unclear how the tissue rem...

Scientific American: Current issue

Change of Heartbeat
by Leslie Nemo
15 Aug 2017 at 12:00am
Wireless pacemakers avoid some of the risks traditional devices pose
Promiscuous Men, Chaste Women and Other Gender Myths
by Cordelia FineMark A. Elgar
15 Aug 2017 at 12:00am
The notion that behavioral differences between the sexes are innate and immutable does not hold up under scrutiny

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
15 Aug 2017 at 1:30pm
Gecko evolution and human-caused isolation Common gecko of the Brazilian Cerrado. Image courtesy of Guilherme Santoro (Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, Brazil). Previous studies have found that human-caused ecosystem changes can drive rapid adaptive changes in local organisms. Mariana Eloy de Amo...
QnAs with Luciana Borio [QnAs]
by Prashant Nair
15 Aug 2017 at 1:30pm
Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) are often held up as a touchstone for assessing the safety and efficacy of new drugs and vaccines. Because randomly assigning patients to either a control or intervention group renders the two groups comparable and reduces bias, RCTs have become the coin ...
Interferon-{gamma} is a master checkpoint regulator of cytokine-induced diffe...
by Zhao Zha, Felicitas Bucher, Anahita Nejatfard, Tianqing Zheng, Hongkai Zhang, Kyungmoo Yea, Richard A. Lerner
15 Aug 2017 at 1:30pm
Cytokines are protein mediators that are known to be involved in many biological processes, including cell growth, survival, inflammation, and development. To study their regulation, we generated a library of 209 different cytokines. This was used in a combinatorial format to study the effects of cy...
DNA damage tolerance in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in mice [Gene...
by Bas Pilzecker, Olimpia Alessandra Buoninfante, Paul van den Berk, Cesare Lancini, Ji-Ying Song, Elisabetta Citterio, Heinz Jacobs
15 Aug 2017 at 1:30pm
DNA damage tolerance (DDT) enables bypassing of DNA lesions during replication, thereby preventing fork stalling, replication stress, and secondary DNA damage related to fork stalling. Three modes of DDT have been documented: translesion synthesis (TLS), template switching (TS), and repriming. TLS a...
Elevated auxin biosynthesis and transport underlie high vein density in C4 le...
by Chi-Fa Huang, Chun-Ping Yu, Yeh-Hua Wu, Mei-Yeh Jade Lu, Shih-Long Tu, Shu-Hsing Wu, Shin-Han Shiu, Maurice S. B. Ku, Wen-Hsiung Li
15 Aug 2017 at 1:30pm
High vein density, a distinctive trait of C4 leaves, is central to both C3-to-C4 evolution and conversion of C3 to C4-like crops. We tested the hypothesis that high vein density in C4 leaves is due to elevated auxin biosynthesis and transport in developing leaves. Up-regulation of genes in auxin bio...
IL-4-secreting eosinophils promote endometrial stromal cell proliferation and...
by Rodolfo D. Vicetti Miguel, Nirk E. Quispe Calla, Darlene Dixon, Robert A. Foster, Andrea Gambotto, Stephen D. Pavelko, Luanne Hall-Stoodley, Thomas L. Cherpes
15 Aug 2017 at 1:30pm
Genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections in women typically are asymptomatic and do not cause permanent upper genital tract (UGT) damage. Consistent with this presentation, type 2 innate and TH2 adaptive immune responses associated with dampened inflammation and tissue repair are elicited in the UGT...
Hyperpolarized 13C MR metabolic imaging can detect neuroinflammation in vivo ...
by Caroline Guglielmetti, Chloe Naȷac, Alessandro Didonna, Annemie Van der Linden, Sabrina M. Ronen, Myriam M. Chaumeil
15 Aug 2017 at 1:30pm
Proinflammatory mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) play a crucial role in the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurodegenerative diseases. Despite advances in neuroimaging, there are currently limited available methods enabling noninvasive detection of MPs in vivo. Interestingly, upon acti...
Three Cambrian fossils assembled into an extinct body plan of cnidarian affin...
by Qiang Ou, Jian Han, Zhifei Zhang, Degan Shu, Ge Sun, Georg Mayer
15 Aug 2017 at 1:30pm
The early Cambrian problematica Xianguangia sinica, Chengjiangopenna wangii, and Galeaplumosus abilus from the Chengjiang biota (Yunnan, China) have caused much controversy in the past and their phylogenetic placements remain unresolved. Here we show, based on exceptionally preserved material (85 ne...
Atypical fracture with long-term bisphosphonate therapy is associated with al...
by Ashley A. Lloyd, Bernd Gludovatz, Christoph Riedel, Emma A. Luengo, Rehan Saiyed, Eric Marty, Dean G. Lorich, Joseph M. Lane, Robert O. Ritchie, Bȷorn Busse, Eve Donnelly
15 Aug 2017 at 1:30pm
Bisphosphonates are the most widely prescribed pharmacologic treatment for osteoporosis and reduce fracture risk in postmenopausal women by up to 50%. However, in the past decade these drugs have been associated with atypical femoral fractures (AFFs), rare fractures with a transverse, brittle morpho...
Toll-like receptor 4 deficiency alters nucleus accumbens synaptic physiology ...
by Daniel T. Kashima, Brad A. Grueter
15 Aug 2017 at 1:30pm
Behavioral manifestations of drug-seeking behavior are causally linked to alterations of synaptic strength onto nucleus accumbens (NAc) medium spiny neurons (MSN). Although neuron-driven changes in physiology and behavior are well characterized, there is a lack of knowledge of the role of the immune...
Habitual sleep as a contributor to racial differences in cardiometabolic risk...
by David S. Curtis, Thomas E. Fuller-Rowell, Mona El-Sheikh, Mercedes R. Carnethon, Carol D. Ryff
15 Aug 2017 at 1:30pm
Insufficient and disrupted sleep is linked with cardiovascular and metabolic dysregulation and morbidity. The current study examines the degree to which differences in sleep between black/African American (AA) and white/European American (EA) adults explain racial differences in cardiometabolic (CMB...
Crop-damaging temperatures increase suicide rates in India [Sustainability Sc...
by Tamma A. Carleton
15 Aug 2017 at 1:30pm
More than three quarters of the world?s suicides occur in developing countries, yet little is known about the drivers of suicidal behavior in poor populations. I study India, where one fifth of global suicides occur and suicide rates have doubled since 1980. Using nationally comprehensive panel data...

Science

[Research Articles] Loss of dual leucine zipper kinase signaling is protectiv...
by Le Pichon, C. E., Meilandt, W. J., Dominguez, S., Solanoy, H., Lin, H., Ngu, H., Gogineni, A., Sengupta Ghosh, A., Jiang, Z., Lee, S.-H., Maloney, J., Gandham, V. D., Pozniak, C. D., Wang, B., Lee, S., Siu, M., Patel, S., Modrusan, Z., Liu, X., Rudhard, Y., Baca, M., Gustafson, A., Kaminker, J., Carano, R. A. D., Huang, E. J., Foreman, O., Weimer, R., Scearce-Levie, K., Lewcock, J. W.
16 Aug 2017 at 1:47pm

Hallmarks of chronic neurodegenerative disease include progressive synaptic loss and neuronal cell death, yet the cellular pathways that underlie these processes remain largely undefined. We provide evidence that dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) is an essential regulator of the progressive neurodege...


[Research Articles] Metabolic differentiation of early Lyme disease from sout...
by Molins, C. R., Ashton, L. V., Wormser, G. P., Andre, B. G., Hess, A. M., Delorey, M. J., Pilgard, M. A., Johnson, B. J., Webb, K., Islam, M. N., Pegalajar-Jurado, A., Molla, I., Jewett, M. W., Belisle, J. T.
16 Aug 2017 at 1:47pm

Lyme disease, the most commonly reported vector-borne disease in the United States, results from infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Early clinical diagnosis of this disease is largely based on the presence of an erythematous skin lesion for individuals in high-risk regions. This, however, can be c...


[Research Articles] Loss of dual leucine zipper kinase signaling is protectiv...
by Le Pichon, C. E., Meilandt, W. J., Dominguez, S., Solanoy, H., Lin, H., Ngu, H., Gogineni, A., Sengupta Ghosh, A., Jiang, Z., Lee, S.-H., Maloney, J., Gandham, V. D., Pozniak, C. D., Wang, B., Lee, S., Siu, M., Patel, S., Modrusan, Z., Liu, X., Rudhard, Y., Baca, M., Gustafson, A., Kaminker, J., Carano, R. A. D., Huang, E. J., Foreman, O., Weimer, R., Scearce-Levie, K., Lewcock, J. W.
16 Aug 2017 at 1:47pm

Hallmarks of chronic neurodegenerative disease include progressive synaptic loss and neuronal cell death, yet the cellular pathways that underlie these processes remain largely undefined. We provide evidence that dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) is an essential regulator of the progressive neurodege...


[Research Articles] Metabolic differentiation of early Lyme disease from sout...
by Molins, C. R., Ashton, L. V., Wormser, G. P., Andre, B. G., Hess, A. M., Delorey, M. J., Pilgard, M. A., Johnson, B. J., Webb, K., Islam, M. N., Pegalajar-Jurado, A., Molla, I., Jewett, M. W., Belisle, J. T.
16 Aug 2017 at 1:47pm

Lyme disease, the most commonly reported vector-borne disease in the United States, results from infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Early clinical diagnosis of this disease is largely based on the presence of an erythematous skin lesion for individuals in high-risk regions. This, however, can be c...


[Editors' Choice] Imaging covert consciousness
by Choi, H. A.
9 Aug 2017 at 2:08pm

Imaging and electroencephalography help to detect covert consciousness after acute brain injury.


[Editors' Choice] I scream, you scream, we all scream for irisin
by Shoemaker, A.
9 Aug 2017 at 2:08pm

Skeletal muscle may communicate with pancreatic beta cells through irisin, a muscle-derived hormone that promotes beta cell survival and insulin release.


[Research Articles] Metabolic and immune effects of immunotherapy with proins...
by Alhadj Ali, M., Liu, Y.-F., Arif, S., Tatovic, D., Shariff, H., Gibson, V. B., Yusuf, N., Baptista, R., Eichmann, M., Petrov, N., Heck, S., Yang, J. H. M., Tree, T. I. M., Pujol-Autonell, I., Yeo, L., Baumard, L. R., Stenson, R., Howell, A., Clark, A., Boult, Z., Powrie, J., Adams, L., Wong, F. S., Luzio, S., Dunseath, G., Green, K., OKeefe, A., Bayly, G., Thorogood, N., Andrews, R., Leech, N., Joseph, F., Nair, S., Seal, S., Cheung, H., Beam, C., Hills, R., Peakman, M., Dayan, C. M.
9 Aug 2017 at 2:08pm

Immunotherapy using short immunogenic peptides of disease-related autoantigens restores immune tolerance in preclinical disease models. We studied safety and mechanistic effects of injecting human leukocyte antigen–DR4(DRB1*0401)–restricted immunodominant proinsulin peptide intradermally...


[Reports] Modulation of prefrontal cortex excitation/inhibition balance rescu...
by Selimbeyoglu, A., Kim, C. K., Inoue, M., Lee, S. Y., Hong, A. S. O., Kauvar, I., Ramakrishnan, C., Fenno, L. E., Davidson, T. J., Wright, M., Deisseroth, K.
2 Aug 2017 at 1:48pm

Alterations in the balance between neuronal excitation and inhibition (E:I balance) have been implicated in the neural circuit activity–based processes that contribute to autism phenotypes. We investigated whether acutely reducing E:I balance in mouse brain could correct deficits in social beh...


[Research Articles] A phenotypically and functionally distinct human TH2 cell...
by Wambre, E., Bajzik, V., DeLong, J. H., OBrien, K., Nguyen, Q.-A., Speake, C., Gersuk, V. H., DeBerg, H. A., Whalen, E., Ni, C., Farrington, M., Jeong, D., Robinson, D., Linsley, P. S., Vickery, B. P., Kwok, W. W.
2 Aug 2017 at 1:48pm

Allergen-specific type 2 helper T (TH2) cells play a central role in initiating and orchestrating the allergic and asthmatic inflammatory response pathways. One major factor limiting the use of such atopic disease–causing T cells as both therapeutic targets and clinically useful biomarkers is ...


[Editors' Choice] Inflamm-vestigating inflamm-aging
by Dupnik, K.
26 Jul 2017 at 1:51pm

Monocytes from elderly people respond differently to pattern recognition receptor engagement than monocytes from younger adults.


[Research Articles] Redundant and diverse intranodal pacemakers and conductio...
by Li, N., Hansen, B. J., Csepe, T. A., Zhao, J., Ignozzi, A. J., Sul, L. V., Zakharkin, S. O., Kalyanasundaram, A., Davis, J. P., Biesiadecki, B. J., Kilic, A., Janssen, P. M. L., Mohler, P. J., Weiss, R., Hummel, J. D., Fedorov, V. V.
26 Jul 2017 at 1:51pm

The human sinoatrial node (SAN) efficiently maintains heart rhythm even under adverse conditions. However, the specific mechanisms involved in the human SAN’s ability to prevent rhythm failure, also referred to as its robustness, are unknown. Challenges exist because the three-dimensional (3D)...


Identification of a primordial asteroid family constrains the original planet...
by Delbo, M., Walsh, K., Bolin, B., Avdellidou, C., Morbidelli, A.
3 Aug 2017 at 1:24pm

A quarter of known asteroids is associated with over a hundred distinct asteroid families, meaning that these asteroids originate as impact fragments from the family parent bodies. The determination of which asteroids of the remaining population are members of undiscovered families, or accreted as p...


Structure of a symmetric photosynthetic reaction center-photosystem
by Gisriel, C., Sarrou, I., Ferlez, B., Golbeck, J. H., Redding, K. E., Fromme, R.
27 Jul 2017 at 1:35pm

Reaction centers are pigment-protein complexes that drive photosynthesis by converting light into chemical energy. It is believed that they arose once from a homodimeric protein. The symmetry of a homodimer is broken in heterodimeric reaction center structures, such as those reported previously. The...


Paneth cells secrete lysozyme via secretory autophagy during bacterial infect...
by Bel, S., Pendse, M., Wang, Y., Li, Y., Ruhn, K. A., Hassell, B., Leal, T., Winter, S. E., Xavier, R. J., Hooper, L. V.
27 Jul 2017 at 1:35pm

Intestinal Paneth cells limit bacterial invasion by secreting antimicrobial proteins including lysozyme. However, invasive pathogens can disrupt the Golgi apparatus, interfering with secretion and compromising intestinal antimicrobial defense. Here we show that during bacterial infection, lysozyme i...


Single-proton spin detection by diamond magnetometry
by Loretz, M., Rosskopf, T., Boss, J. M., Pezzagna, S., Meijer, J., Degen, C. L.
8 Jan 2015 at 2:55pm

Extending magnetic resonance imaging to the atomic scale has been a long-standing aspiration, driven by the prospect of directly mapping atomic positions in molecules with three-dimensional spatial resolution. We report detection of individual, isolated proton spins by a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center...


A Single Molecular Spin Valve
by Schon, Emberly, Kirczenow
18 Apr 2002 at 2:53pm

The charge transport through a single benzene-1,4-dithiolate molecule embedded in an inert matrix of insulating alkanethiol molecules and sandwiched between ferromagnetic electrodes is studied as a function of magnetic field. Electronic transport through the device structure shows a pronounced spin ...



British Medical Journal

Seven days in medicine: 9-15 August 2017
17 Aug 2017 at 4:44am
Maternity servicesNine in 10 obstetric units have unfilled rotasSome 88% of obstetric units in Britain surveyed from January to March said that they had had problems filling registrar rotas in the...

New England Journal of Medicine

Biomarkers and Aging in the News

Time spent frail in old age 'doubles'
More care homes are needed as an ageing population puts pressure on services, researchers suggest.
15 Aug 2017 at 7:00pm
'Fat but fit' still risk heart disease
Even if medical tests don't show up any problems, being overweight is bad for the heart, experts say.
14 Aug 2017 at 7:32pm
Asthma, on rise in older adults, tends to be ignored
In early June, Donna Bilgore Robins stood on a patio in Beaver Creek, Colo., under a crystal-clear blue sky and tried to catch her breath.
17 Aug 2017 at 4:32am
'Fat but fit' still has higher risk of heart disease
The idea that you can be overweight or obese yet healthy -- if factors such as your blood sugar, blood pressure or cholesterol levels are normal -- is a myth, according to a new study, and messaging around this should be changed.
14 Aug 2017 at 7:41pm
133% leap in children admitted to ER for marijuana, study finds
As attitudes about marijuana shift around the world, researchers are warning parents that it's risky to keep it around children, especially those who are too young to know what it is.
14 Aug 2017 at 10:27am
Cardiac stem cells rejuvenate rats' aging hearts, study says
Cardiac stem cells derived from young hearts helped reverse the signs of aging when directly injected into the old hearts of elderly rats, a study published Monday in the European Heart Journal demonstrated.
14 Aug 2017 at 10:46am

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For Transgender Women, an Extra Dose of Fear
Many transgender women say they feel increasingly unsafe, and that ?passing? is necessary for survival.
14 Aug 2017 at 11:18pm
Less Sleep Tied to Diabetes Risk in Children
The fewer hours of sleep a child got, the greater the risk of a higher B.M.I. and insulin resistance.
15 Aug 2017 at 12:01am
Why Some Say the Eclipse Is Best Experienced in a Crowd
Human behavior researchers offer four reasons why it's worth experiencing totality in a large group, even if the toilets overflow.
16 Aug 2017 at 4:46am

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Melanoma cases rising; young women at greatest risk
Study says that could be because they are more likely to use tanning beds than men.        
2 Apr 2012 at 10:15am
Long use of any hormones raises women's breast cancer risk
A new study tracked about 60,000 nurses and found that use of any kind of hormones for 10 years or more slightly raised the chances.        
1 Apr 2012 at 1:28pm
Radiation may up breast cancer risk in some women
Mammograms might raise the chances of developing cancer in young women whose genes put them at higher risk, a study suggests.        
6 Sep 2012 at 6:30pm
U.N.: Chemicals damaging health and environment
The report by the U.N. Environment Program warned that the increasing production of chemicals is increasing health costs.        
6 Sep 2012 at 11:25am
Study: Ginkgo doesn't prevent Alzheimer's disease
Taking ginkgo biloba didn't prevent Alzheimer's disease in older adults, according to the biggest prevention study in Europe.       
5 Sep 2012 at 10:34pm
University pulls Kinsey Institute app over privacy concerns
The Kinsey Institute released a new mobile app that allows users to report on sexual behavior and experiences.       
5 Sep 2012 at 9:43pm
War might be making young bodies old
A VA study finds that veterans in their 20s and 30s show signs of premature aging.       
5 Sep 2012 at 5:56pm

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Express Scripts to limit opioid prescriptions
Move by largest pharmacy benefits manager to lower addiction risks of painkillers draws objections from AMA
16 Aug 2017 at 7:15pm
Why is knee arthritis twice as common as it used to be?
It's estimated that the lifetime risk of developing the condition is 46 percent
15 Aug 2017 at 3:51pm
Why are cases of knee osteoarthritis on the rise?
A new study found osteoarthritis of the knee is more than twice as common as it was just a few generations ago. It's estimated the lifetime risk of developing this condition is 46 percent, but it is possible to protect your knees. Dr. Jordan Metzl, a sports medicine physician at New York's Hospital for Special Surgery, joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss possible reasons for the increase and what you can do to reduce the symptoms.
15 Aug 2017 at 1:13pm
An alcoholic drink per day can lower risk of cardiovascular disease, study says
Having a glass of wine or beer with dinner tonight may be good for you, according to a new study. Researchers found women who had up to one drink a day and men who averaged up to two a day had a lower risk of dying from cardiovascular disease. Dr. Jon LaPook explains.
14 Aug 2017 at 11:45pm
Morning Rounds: Colon cancer deaths, stroke rates among women
Dr. Tara Narula joins "CBS This Morning: Saturday" to discuss a surprising and concerning rise in colon cancer death rates among younger Americans, a new study that shows stroke rates are going down for men but not women and a new development in the on-going battle with antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
12 Aug 2017 at 12:48pm
How to protect your eyes while viewing the solar eclipse
Millions of Americans will look at the sky on Aug. 21 for the first coast-to-coast total eclipse of the sun in 99 years. But if you want to catch a glimpse, you should take precautions to avoid damaging your vision. Ophthamologist Dr. Christopher Starr joins "CBS This Morning" with more on how to protect your eyes.
11 Aug 2017 at 2:39pm
Medigap supplemental coverage can be too pricey for younger Medicare benefici...
One night three years ago, Joe Hobson finished reading a book, went to sleep and woke up blind. The problem, caused by a rare hereditary disease, forced him to give up his 20-year communications job, along with its generous health insurance. Now 63, the Arlington man is covered by Medicare, the f...
7 Mar 2011 at 6:32pm
Type 2 diabetes surges in people younger than 20
U.S. cases in those under 20 have grown from almost zero to tens of thousands in just over a decade.
22 Mar 2011 at 3:48pm
Fear is potent risk of Japanese nuclear crisis
The psychological impact of Japanese nuclear crisis could turn out to be significant
15 Mar 2011 at 5:31am
How men and women exercise differently
No one wants to think she's a cliche. But it's time for me to recognize that when it comes to my gym behavior, that's exactly what I am: a cardio-loving woman who has to be forced to hoist a dumbbell.
1 Mar 2011 at 11:59am
Many Americans have poor health literacy
An elderly woman sent home from the hospital develops a life-threatening infection because she doesn't understand the warning signs listed in the discharge instructions. A man flummoxed by an intake form in a doctor's office reflexively writes "no" to every question because he doesn't understand ...
28 Feb 2011 at 8:37pm
'Policy Review' essay covers PTSD; veteran benefits
How could a Veterans Administration rule making it easier for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to file disability claims be a bad thing? In a "Policy Review" essay called "PTSD's Diagnostic Trap," psychiatrist and Yale University School of Medicine lecturer Sally Satel argues that ful...
21 Feb 2011 at 11:47am
Women are more likely than men to give up sleep to care for children and others
Call it the real night shift - that noctural period when bleary-eyed adults leave warm beds to tend to the needs of sick kids, elderly parents, an ailing spouse or incontinent pet. So, who takes the night shift: Mom or Dad?
14 Feb 2011 at 8:22pm
Enrollment in high-risk insurance pools lagging behind predictions
More Americans have been signing up for special health plans designed for people with medical problems that caused them to be spurned by the insurance industry, according to new government figures. But enrollment continues to lag significantly behind original predictions.
10 Feb 2011 at 9:35pm
Can One Simple Nutritional Change Make You More Productive?
Science says it may come down to managing blood sugar.
16 Aug 2017 at 4:03pm
3 Genius Beach Hacks to Try This Month
Jeff Rossen shows us his tricks for a stress-free day by the water.
15 Aug 2017 at 2:48pm
Why Does Texas Have the Highest Maternal Mortality Rate in Developed World?
Texas has the highest rate of maternal mortality in all of the developed world. One lawmaker hopes a task force will determine why this is.
12 Aug 2017 at 5:56am

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For Transgender Women, an Extra Dose of Fear
Many transgender women say they feel increasingly unsafe, and that ?passing? is necessary for survival.
14 Aug 2017 at 11:18pm
Less Sleep Tied to Diabetes Risk in Children
The fewer hours of sleep a child got, the greater the risk of a higher B.M.I. and insulin resistance.
15 Aug 2017 at 12:01am
Why Some Say the Eclipse Is Best Experienced in a Crowd
Human behavior researchers offer four reasons why it's worth experiencing totality in a large group, even if the toilets overflow.
16 Aug 2017 at 4:46am
Two areas for familiar face recognition in the primate brain

Familiarity alters face recognition: Familiar faces are recognized more accurately than unfamiliar ones and under difficult viewing conditions when unfamiliar face recognition fails. The neural basis for this fundamental difference remains unknown. Using whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that personally familiar faces engage the macaque face-processing network more than unfamiliar faces. Familiar faces also recruited two hitherto unknown face areas at anatomically conse...


10 Aug 2017 at 1:28pm
Pavlovian conditioning-induced hallucinations result from overweighting of pe...

Some people hear voices that others do not, but only some of those people seek treatment. Using a Pavlovian learning task, we induced conditioned hallucinations in four groups of people who differed orthogonally in their voice-hearing and treatment-seeking statuses. People who hear voices were significantly more susceptible to the effect. Using functional neuroimaging and computational modeling of perception, we identified processes that differentiated voice-hearers from non–voice-hearers ...


10 Aug 2017 at 1:28pm
Experts: Neck Floaties Risky for Babies
Experts warn parents from using neck floats on their babies in the water.
15 Aug 2017 at 4:19pm
Are Big Lifestyle Changes Key to Managing Type 2?
Study finds lower blood sugar, reduced need for medication
15 Aug 2017 at 4:15pm
Less Sleep May Raise Child's Type 2 Diabetes Risk
It found link -- but no proof -- between less slumber and risk factors for blood sugar disease
15 Aug 2017 at 4:15pm
A Little Drinking Might Lengthen Your Life: Study
But researchers stress too much alcohol can increase risk of early death
15 Aug 2017 at 4:15pm
'Fat But Fit' a Myth?
Extra weight linked to extra risk, even if blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol all normal
14 Aug 2017 at 6:15pm
Air Purifiers May Help the Smog-Stressed Heart
Small Chinese study found lower stress hormone levels in those who used indoor air cleaners
14 Aug 2017 at 6:15pm
Marijuana May Help Ease Nerve Pain
But evidence for using pot to treat other types of pain or post-traumatic stress remains inconclusive
14 Aug 2017 at 6:15pm
'Smart' Underwear May Help Prevent Back Pain
With just a tap, wearable device eases stress, fatigue on lower back muscles, researchers say
11 Aug 2017 at 10:15am
Alcohol Use, Abuse on the Rise in U.S.
Women and older adults among those drinking more, study finds
9 Aug 2017 at 2:15pm
Essential Oils: Natural Doesn?t Mean Risk-Free
Essential oils are increasingly popular, but using them incorrectly, or overdoing it, can be dangerous.
9 Aug 2017 at 12:44pm
Yoga May Boost Aging Brains
Changes seen in areas involved with attention and memory, but it's not yet clear if yoga is the cause
9 Aug 2017 at 10:15am
'Loneliness Epidemic' Named a Public Health Threat
Social isolation tied to increased risk for premature death, research suggests
7 Aug 2017 at 4:15pm

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England will need over 71,000 extra care home places by 2025
The number of older people who will need substantial care is set to rise by 85.7 per cent, as increases in ?healthspan? continue to lag behind longer lifespans
15 Aug 2017 at 7:30pm
Choosing alternative cancer treatment doubles your risk of death
People who choose alternative cancer medicines tend to be wealthier and have higher levels of education, but are more than twice as likely to die in five years
15 Aug 2017 at 1:10pm
Even ?healthy? overweight people have a higher cardiac risk
Being overweight or obese is linked to coronary heart disease and heart attacks even when a person has healthy blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol
14 Aug 2017 at 8:05pm
Childhood exercise may protect against memory loss in old age
Rats that run during their youth are better able to remember new things when they are older - a finding that suggests exercise may help prevent dementia
14 Aug 2017 at 2:00pm
England?s dire north-south health gap is a scandal that must end
The north-south divide in England needs fixing or the country risks more despair, premature death and political earthquakes, says James Bloodworth
9 Aug 2017 at 10:51am
Blood biomarkers may help diagnose chronic fatigue syndrome
The severity of chronic fatigue syndrome, also called myalgic encephomyelitis, has been linked to higher levels of 17 inflammation biomarkers in the blood
2 Aug 2017 at 7:00am
Eating Fatty Foods May Still Kill You, Even If You?re Skinny
A new study finds eating foods high in calories can still increase your risk of certain cancers, even if you're a healthy body weight.
17 Aug 2017 at 12:00am
Being 'Obese But Fit' Can Still Harm Your Heart Health, Researchers Say
Carrying extra weight, but being otherwise healthy, could still raise your risk of heart attack, according to a new study.
16 Aug 2017 at 6:19pm
5 Tips To Reduce Stress Using Humor, Your Best Weapon
America is more stressed than ever; finding light in difficult situations could be key to coping.
14 Aug 2017 at 6:15pm
Miscarriage And Birth Defect Risk May Be Reduced With Vitamin B3 Supplement
New research suggests that a common and easy to find vitamin may be able to prevent some miscarriages.
11 Aug 2017 at 7:14pm
Colorectal Cancer Deaths Are Rising Among The Younger Generation
More Americans under the age of 55 are dying from colorectal cancer, study finds.
10 Aug 2017 at 6:49pm
Smoking Pot And High BP Risk: Can Marijuana Harm Your Heart Health?
Researchers at Georgia State University have found a link between smoking pot and high blood pressure.
10 Aug 2017 at 6:30pm

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School Safety Tips For Younger Kids
School is back in session, so take some time to go over these important safety tips with your children. This is just the beginning of the conversation, but it's a great place to get started.
21 Jul 2014 at 8:00am
Experts: Neck Floaties Risky for Babies
Experts warn parents from using neck floats on their babies in the water.
15 Aug 2017 at 4:19pm
Are Big Lifestyle Changes Key to Managing Type 2?
Study finds lower blood sugar, reduced need for medication
15 Aug 2017 at 4:15pm
Less Sleep May Raise Child's Type 2 Diabetes Risk
It found link -- but no proof -- between less slumber and risk factors for blood sugar disease
15 Aug 2017 at 4:15pm
A Little Drinking Might Lengthen Your Life: Study
But researchers stress too much alcohol can increase risk of early death
15 Aug 2017 at 4:15pm
'Fat But Fit' a Myth?
Extra weight linked to extra risk, even if blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol all normal
14 Aug 2017 at 6:15pm
Air Purifiers May Help the Smog-Stressed Heart
Small Chinese study found lower stress hormone levels in those who used indoor air cleaners
14 Aug 2017 at 6:15pm
Marijuana May Help Ease Nerve Pain
But evidence for using pot to treat other types of pain or post-traumatic stress remains inconclusive
14 Aug 2017 at 6:15pm
'Smart' Underwear May Help Prevent Back Pain
With just a tap, wearable device eases stress, fatigue on lower back muscles, researchers say
11 Aug 2017 at 10:15am
Alcohol Use, Abuse on the Rise in U.S.
Women and older adults among those drinking more, study finds
9 Aug 2017 at 2:15pm
Essential Oils: Natural Doesn?t Mean Risk-Free
Essential oils are increasingly popular, but using them incorrectly, or overdoing it, can be dangerous.
9 Aug 2017 at 12:44pm
Yoga May Boost Aging Brains
Changes seen in areas involved with attention and memory, but it's not yet clear if yoga is the cause
9 Aug 2017 at 10:15am
'Loneliness Epidemic' Named a Public Health Threat
Social isolation tied to increased risk for premature death, research suggests
7 Aug 2017 at 4:15pm
Medigap supplemental coverage can be too pricey for younger Medicare benefici...
One night three years ago, Joe Hobson finished reading a book, went to sleep and woke up blind. The problem, caused by a rare hereditary disease, forced him to give up his 20-year communications job, along with its generous health insurance. Now 63, the Arlington man is covered by Medicare, the f...
7 Mar 2011 at 6:32pm
Type 2 diabetes surges in people younger than 20
U.S. cases in those under 20 have grown from almost zero to tens of thousands in just over a decade.
22 Mar 2011 at 3:48pm
Fear is potent risk of Japanese nuclear crisis
The psychological impact of Japanese nuclear crisis could turn out to be significant
15 Mar 2011 at 5:31am
How men and women exercise differently
No one wants to think she's a cliche. But it's time for me to recognize that when it comes to my gym behavior, that's exactly what I am: a cardio-loving woman who has to be forced to hoist a dumbbell.
1 Mar 2011 at 11:59am
Many Americans have poor health literacy
An elderly woman sent home from the hospital develops a life-threatening infection because she doesn't understand the warning signs listed in the discharge instructions. A man flummoxed by an intake form in a doctor's office reflexively writes "no" to every question because he doesn't understand ...
28 Feb 2011 at 8:37pm
'Policy Review' essay covers PTSD; veteran benefits
How could a Veterans Administration rule making it easier for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to file disability claims be a bad thing? In a "Policy Review" essay called "PTSD's Diagnostic Trap," psychiatrist and Yale University School of Medicine lecturer Sally Satel argues that ful...
21 Feb 2011 at 11:47am
Women are more likely than men to give up sleep to care for children and others
Call it the real night shift - that noctural period when bleary-eyed adults leave warm beds to tend to the needs of sick kids, elderly parents, an ailing spouse or incontinent pet. So, who takes the night shift: Mom or Dad?
14 Feb 2011 at 8:22pm
Enrollment in high-risk insurance pools lagging behind predictions
More Americans have been signing up for special health plans designed for people with medical problems that caused them to be spurned by the insurance industry, according to new government figures. But enrollment continues to lag significantly behind original predictions.
10 Feb 2011 at 9:35pm

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Why Some Say the Eclipse Is Best Experienced in a Crowd
Human behavior researchers offer four reasons why it's worth experiencing totality in a large group, even if the toilets overflow.
16 Aug 2017 at 4:46am
A great workout hike ? with stunning views

The Verdugo Mountains separating the communities of Montrose and La Crescenta from Glendale and Burbank rise sharply and present impressive city and valley views. Here?s a brisk hike that will get you to the top in a hurry ? huffing and puffing. Go early in the day to beat the heat. Take lots of...


10 Aug 2017 at 5:00pm
With diabetes rising at alarming rate, California puts money behind preventio...

California officials decided this week to dedicate $5 million to prevent people at high risk for diabetes from getting the disease, hoping to stem the huge numbers of Californians expected to be diagnosed in the coming years.

Currently 9% of Californians have diabetes, but a study last year found...


11 Jul 2017 at 9:05pm
How to keep skin looking young? We asked the experts

The beauty market is awash with anti-aging products, and the lists of ingredients in serums and creams that promise to slow down or reverse that process can be confounding.

Take a look at the fine print and you might encounter Vitamin C or green tea extract or alpha-hydroxy acids. Can anything...


1 Jul 2017 at 12:00pm
Drink to your health? It depends on how much drinking you do, study shows

This just in, and it?s definitive (for now): People who drink alcohol in moderation ? especially older people, women and non-Latino white people ? are less likely to die of any cause than are teetotalers or people who consume heavy doses of alcohol either on occasion or in an average week.

In follow-up...


14 Aug 2017 at 8:35pm

NIH Press Releases



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NIH News Release
NIH News Release
News releases from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Affective neuroscience expert Dr. Richard Davidson to speak on meditation res...
20 Apr 2016 at 1:00pm
NCCIH presents ?Change Your Brain by Transforming Your Mind?.


NIH study finds factors that may influence influenza vaccine effectiveness
19 Apr 2016 at 8:30pm
Long-held approach to predicting seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness may need to be revisited.


Statement on Review of NIH Sterile Production Facilities
19 Apr 2016 at 8:15pm
Production suspended in two facilities.


NCI opens online platform to submit ideas about research for Cancer Moonshot
18 Apr 2016 at 8:15pm
Submissions will be considered by a panel of scientific experts and patient advocates.


Healthy diet may reduce high blood pressure risk after gestational diabetes, ...
18 Apr 2016 at 8:00pm
Women who have had gestational diabetes may indeed benefit from a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.


NIH launches research program to reduce health disparities in surgical outcomes
18 Apr 2016 at 3:00pm
The initiative will involve collaborations among several NIH institutes and centers, AHRQ.


Islet transplantation restores blood sugar awareness and control in type 1 di...
18 Apr 2016 at 2:00pm
NIH-funded study lays groundwork for potential application submission to FDA for licensure of islet preparation.


Greenness around homes linked to lower mortality
15 Apr 2016 at 4:00pm
Researchers found the biggest differences in death rates from kidney disease, respiratory disease, and cancer.


NIH sequences genome of a fungus that causes life-threatening pneumonia
11 Apr 2016 at 3:00pm
Pneumocystis was one of the first infections that led to the initial recognition of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.


New role identified for scars at the site of injured spinal cord
7 Apr 2016 at 7:00pm
NIH-funded mouse study suggests scar formation may help, not hinder, nerve regrowth.


NIH Announcements


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NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA)
Weekly Funding Opportunities and Policy Notices from the National Institutes of Health.

Notice of Intent to Publish a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Conformanc...
12 Dec 2016 at 11:52am
Notice NOT-FD-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Reminder: NHLBI FY2017 Small Business Topics of Special Interest (TOSI) for t...
12 Dec 2016 at 11:48am
Notice NOT-HL-16-479 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Notice of Extension of the Expiration Date for PA-16-282 Developing New Clini...
12 Dec 2016 at 1:25am
Notice NOT-HS-17-005 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Notice of an Informational Webinar for RFA-NS-17-017 "Frontotemporal Degenera...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:09am
Notice NOT-NS-17-010 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory - Pragmatic Clinical Trials Demonstr...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:33am
Funding Opportunity RFA-AT-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this FOA is to solicit UG3/UH3 phased cooperative agreement research applications to conduct efficient, large-scale pragmatic clinical trial Demonstration Projects within the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and other co-morbid conditions in U.S. military personnel, veterans and their families. This program will be referred to as the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory program. Awards made under this FOA will initially support a two-year milestone-driven planning phase (UG3), with possible transition to a pragmatic trial Demonstration Project implementation phase (UH3). UG3 projects that have met the scientific milestone and feasibility requirements may transition to the UH3 phase. The UG3/UH3 application must be submitted as a single application, following the instructions described in this FOA. The overall goal of this initiative, jointly supported by the NIH, DoD, and VA, is to develop the capacity to implement cost-effective large-scale clinical research in military and veteran health care delivery organizations focusing on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and other comorbid conditions. The NIH, DoD, and VA expect to: establish a Coordinating Center that will provide national leadership and technical expertise for all aspects of health care system (HCS_- focused research including assistance to UG3/UH3 grant applicants. Primary outcomes of treatment interventions include assessing pain and pain reduction, ability to function in daily life, quality of life, and medication usage/reduction/discontinuation. Secondary outcomes focusing on assessing comorbid conditions or those co-occurring with high frequency in this population are also of interest under the FOA.
NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory - Coordinating Center (U24)
12 Dec 2016 at 3:33am
Funding Opportunity RFA-AT-17-002 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this FOA is to solicit applications for a Coordinating Center (CC) to provide national leadership for the NIH-DoD-VA Health Care Systems (HCS) Research Collaboratory program on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and comorbidities in U.S. military personnel, veterans and their families. For brevity, this initiative will be referred to as the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory. Coordinating Center applicants will need to: 1) develop, adapt, and adopt technical and policy guidelines and best practices for the effective conduct of research in partnership with health care systems focused on military personnel, veterans, and their families; 2) work collaboratively with and provide technical, design, and other support to Demonstration Project teams, to develop and implement a pragmatic trial protocol; and 3) disseminate widely Collaboratory-endorsed policies and best practices and lessons learned in the Demonstration Projects for implementing research within health care settings. The Coordinating Center will also serve as the central resource for the activities of the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory program, including providing administrative support for a Steering Committee and its subcommittees.
Innovations for Healthy Living - Improving Population Health and Eliminating ...
12 Dec 2016 at 12:04pm
Funding Opportunity RFA-MD-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant applications that propose to develop a product, process or service for commercialization with the aim of reducing disparities in healthcare access and health outcomes and in preventing disease and improving health in one or more NIH-defined health disparity population group(s). Appropriate technologies should be effective, affordable, culturally acceptable, and deliverable to racial/ethnic minorities, low-income and rural populations.
Technologies for Improving Minority Health and Eliminating Health Disparities...
12 Dec 2016 at 12:04pm
Funding Opportunity RFA-MD-17-002 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant applications that propose to develop a product, process or service for commercialization with the aim of reducing disparities in healthcare access and health outcomes in one or more NIH-defined health disparity population group(s). Appropriate technologies should be effective, affordable, culturally acceptable, and deliverable to racial/ethnic minorities, low-income and rural populations.
Novel Analytical Approaches for Metabolomics Data (R03)
12 Dec 2016 at 9:57am
Funding Opportunity RFA-RM-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this small research grant Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to foster collaboration between computational scientists, metabolomics experts, and biomedical researchers in developing, piloting, and/or validating novel bioinformatic approaches that address current analytical hurdles in metabolomics data. A goal of providing powerful approaches that will be useful to biomedical researchers, as well as bioinformaticians, is particularly encouraged. Projects are not intended to supplement ongoing metabolomics analyses, but to provide a tool for broader use by the biomedical research community. Projects are expected to use existing, publicly available metabolomics data and complement the efforts and resources of the Common Fund Metabolomics Program.
Utilizing Health Information Technology to Scale and Spread Successful Practi...
12 Dec 2016 at 10:39am
Funding Opportunity PA-17-077 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites R18 grant applications for research that demonstrates how health information technology (IT) can improve patient-centered health outcomes and quality of care in primary care and other ambulatory settings through the scale and spread of successful, health IT-enabled practice models that use patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures to achieve these objectives.
Administrative Supplement for Research on Sex/Gender Influences (Admin Supp)
12 Dec 2016 at 1:27am
Funding Opportunity PA-17-078 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) announces the availability of administrative supplements to support research highlighting the impact of sex/gender influences and/or sex and gender factors in human health and illness, including basic, preclinical, clinical and behavioral studies. Of special interest are studies relevant to understanding the significance of biological sex on cells and tissue explants; comparative studies of male and female tissues, organ systems and physiological systems; sex-based comparisons of pathophysiology, biomarkers, gene expression, clinical presentation and prevention and treatment of diseases. The most robust experimental designs include consideration of both sex and gender; therefore, applications proposing to investigate the influence of both sex and gender factors are highly encouraged. The proposed research must address at least one objective from Goals 1 through 3 of the NIH Strategic Plan for Women's Health Research.
Shared Instrumentation Grant (SIG) Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 10:19am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-074 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Shared Instrument Grant (SIG) Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems that cost at least $50,000. There is no maximum price requirement; however, the maximum award is $600,000. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffractometers, mass and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and light microscopes, cell sorters, and biomedical imagers.
Shared Instrumentation for Animal Research (SIFAR) Grant Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 11:23am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-075 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Shared Instrumentation for Animal Research (SIFAR) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-funded investigators to purchase or upgrade scientific instruments necessary to carry out animal experiments in all areas of biomedical research supported by the NIH. Applicants may request clusters of commercially available instruments configured as specialized integrated systems or as series of instruments to support a thematic workflow in a well-defined area of research using animals or related materials. Priority will be given to specialized clusters of instruments and to uniquely configured systems to support innovative and potentially transformative investigations. Requests for a single instrument will be considered only if the instrument is to be placed in a barrier facility. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) supports requests for state-of-the art commercially available technologies needed for NIH-funded research using any vertebrate and invertebrate animal species. It is expected that the use of the awarded instruments will enhance the scientific rigor of animal research and improve the reproducibility of experimental outcomes. One item of the requested instrumentation must cost at least $50,000. No instrument in a cluster can cost less than $20,000. There is no maximum price requirement; however, the maximum award is $750,000.
High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 12:15pm
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-076 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems that cost at least $600,001. The maximum award is $2,000,000. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffraction systems, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and confocal microscopes, cell-sorters, and biomedical imagers.
Increasing the Use of Medications for the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorders ...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:26am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-079 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages health services research designed to increase the public health impact of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmacotherapies for the treatment of alcohol use disorder. Significant progress is needed in developing generalizable, scalable, cost-effective strategies to move these evidence-based interventions into the mainstream of alcohol use disorder treatment, in both general medical and specialty care settings. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) seeks applications to conduct hypothesis-driven research to identify effective methods for increasing the utilization of currently-available medications, by addressing their acceptability (to prescribers and patients), perceived effectiveness, affordability, and feasibility of use within existing care delivery systems.