Aging, Longevity and Health in the News


Nature: Current issue

A massive, dead disk galaxy in the early Universe
by Sune ToftJohannes ZablJohan RichardAnna GallazziStefano ZibettiMoire PrescottClaudio GrilloAllison W. S. ManNicholas Y. LeeCarlos Gómez-GuijarroMikkel StockmannGeorgios MagdisCharles L. Steinhardt
21 Jun 2017 at 12:00am
At redshift z?=?2, when the Universe was just three billion years old, half of the most massive galaxies were extremely compact and had already exhausted their fuel for star formation. It is believed that they were formed in intense nuclear starbursts and that they ultimately grew into the most mass...
Microglia-dependent synapse loss in type I interferon-mediated lupus
by Allison R. BialasJessy PresumeyAbhishek DasCees E. van der PoelPeter H. LapchakLuka MesinGabriel VictoraGeorge C. TsokosChristian MawrinRonald HerbstMichael C. Carroll
14 Jun 2017 at 12:00am
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an incurable autoimmune disease characterized by autoantibody deposition in tissues such as kidney, skin and lungs. Notably, up to 75% of patients with SLE experience neuropsychiatric symptoms that range from anxiety, depression and cognitive impairment to seizu...
Addendum: The antibody aducanumab reduces A? plaques in Alzheimer?s disease
by Jeff SevignyPing ChiaoThierry BussičrePaul H. WeinrebLeslie WilliamsMarcel MaierRobert DunstanStephen SallowayTianle ChenYan LingJohn O?GormanFang QianMahin ArastuMingwei LiSowmya ChollateMelanie S. BrennanOmar Quintero-MonzonRobert H. ScannevinH. Moore ArnoldThomas EngberKenneth RhodesJames FerreroYaming HangAlvydas MikulskisJan GrimmChristoph HockRoger M. NitschAlfred Sandrock
21 Jun 2017 at 12:00am
Nature537, 50?56 (2016); doi:10.1038/nature19323Figure 1 of our original Article illustrated that treatment with aducanumab reduced human brain amyloid-? plaques in a dose-dependent fashion as measured by florbetapir positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The figure gave the

Scientific American: Current issue

Black Holes from the Beginning of Time
by Juan García-BellidoSébastien Clesse
20 Jun 2017 at 12:00am
A hidden population of black holes born less than one second after the big bang could solve the mystery of dark matter
Memory's Intricate Web
by Alcino J. Silva
20 Jun 2017 at 12:00am
A technical revolution provides insight into how the brain links memories, a process critical for understanding and organizing the world around us
The Evolution of Dance
by Thea Singer
20 Jun 2017 at 12:00am
Do humans dance just for fun, or did it help our ancestors survive thousands of years ago?
Grandma's Robot Helper
by Catherine Caruso
20 Jun 2017 at 12:00am
Machines that read human social cues show promise in assisting the elderly
Drilling for Fossil Gold
by Steve Mirsky
20 Jun 2017 at 12:00am
Two new books look at evolution from head to below your toes

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Informational content of relative deprivation as a channel linking economic i...
by Andre van Hoorn
20 Jun 2017 at 12:04pm
The evidence that economic inequality (or relative deprivation) increases risk taking, as presented in PNAS by Payne et al. (1), is an insightful addition to a broader literature that finds that relative deprivation has distinct effects on individuals, not the least of which is their happiness, in a...
Reply to van Hoorn: Social comparisons of “enough” are an infor...
by B. Keith Payne, Jazmin L. Brown-Iannuzzi, Jason W. Hannay
20 Jun 2017 at 12:04pm
In response to our article (1), van Hoorn (2) suggests that our analysis focuses too narrowly on perceived need as the mechanism linking inequality to increased risk taking. The author does not dispute the evidence we present for the role of perceived need, but proposes an additional mechanism linki...
Reply to Slooten et al.: Viewing fisheries management challenges in a global ...
by Michael C. Melnychuk, Ray Hilborn, Matthew Elliott, Emily Peterson, Rosemary J. Hurst, Pamela M. Mace, Paul J. Starr
20 Jun 2017 at 12:04pm
Slooten et al. (1) claim the survey respondents from New Zealand, one of 28 countries considered in our paper in PNAS (2), were strongly biased toward the fishing industry. The six survey responses comprised a range of background experience: three government/science respondents (added here as coauth...
Sensory and cognitive adaptations to social living in insect societies [Evolu...
by Tom Wenseleers, Jelle S. van Zweden
20 Jun 2017 at 12:04pm
A key question in evolutionary biology is to explain the causes and consequences of the so-called ?major transitions in evolution,? which resulted in the progressive evolution of cells, organisms, and animal societies (1?3). Several studies, for example, have now aimed to determine which suite of ad...
Treatment with diphenyl-pyrazole compound anle138b/c reveals that {alpha}-syn...
by Elisa Turriani, Diana F. Lazaro, Sergey Ryazanov, Andrei Leonov, Armin Giese, Margarete Schon, Michael P. Schon, Christian Griesinger, Tiago F. Outeiro, Donna J. Arndt–Jovin, Dorothea Becker
20 Jun 2017 at 12:04pm
Recent epidemiological and clinical studies have reported a significantly increased risk for melanoma in people with Parkinson?s disease. Because no evidence could be obtained that genetic factors are the reason for the association between these two diseases, we hypothesized that of the three major ...
Solitary bees reduce investment in communication compared with their social r...
by Bernadette Wittwer, Abraham Hefetz, Tovit Simon, Li E. K. Murphy, Mark A. Elgar, Naomi E. Pierce, Sarah D. Kocher
20 Jun 2017 at 12:04pm
Social animals must communicate to define group membership and coordinate social organization. For social insects, communication is predominantly mediated through chemical signals, and as social complexity increases, so does the requirement for a greater diversity of signals. This relationship is pa...
Recent evolution of extreme cestode growth suppression by a vertebrate host [...
by Jesse N. Weber, Natalie C. Steinel, Kum Chuan Shim, Daniel I. Bolnick
20 Jun 2017 at 12:04pm
Parasites can be a major cause of natural selection on hosts, which consequently evolve a variety of strategies to avoid, eliminate, or tolerate infection. When ecologically similar host populations present disparate infection loads, this natural variation can reveal immunological strategies underly...
Impact of nutrition on social decision making [Neuroscience]
by Sabrina Strang, Christina Hoeber, Olaf Uhl, Berthold Koletzko, Thomas F. Munte, Hendrik Lehnert, Raymond J. Dolan, Sebastian M. Schmid, Soyoung Q. Park
20 Jun 2017 at 12:04pm
Food intake is essential for maintaining homeostasis, which is necessary for survival in all species. However, food intake also impacts multiple biochemical processes that influence our behavior. Here, we investigate the causal relationship between macronutrient composition, its bodily biochemical i...
Histamine modulation of the basal ganglia circuitry in the development of pat...
by Maximiliano Rapanelli, Luciana Frick, Haruhiko Bito, Christopher Pittenger
20 Jun 2017 at 12:04pm
Aberrant histaminergic function has been proposed as a cause of tic disorders. A rare mutation in the enzyme that produces histamine (HA), histidine decarboxylase (HDC), has been identified in patients with Tourette syndrome (TS). Hdc knockout mice exhibit repetitive behavioral pathology and neuroch...
Impact of International Monetary Fund programs on child health [Population Bi...
by Adel Daoud, Elias Nosrati, Bernhard Reinsberg, Alexander E. Kentikelenis, Thomas H. Stubbs, Lawrence P. King
20 Jun 2017 at 12:04pm
Parental education is located at the center of global efforts to improve child health. In a developing-country context, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) plays a crucial role in determining how governments allocate scarce resources to education and public health interventions. Under reforms mand...
Dynamics of avian haemosporidian assemblages through millennial time scales i...
by Leticia Soares, Steven C. Latta, Robert E. Ricklefs
20 Jun 2017 at 12:04pm
Although introduced hemosporidian (malaria) parasites (Apicomplexa: Haemosporida) have hastened the extinction of endemic bird species in the Hawaiian Islands and perhaps elsewhere, little is known about the temporal dynamics of endemic malaria parasite populations. Haemosporidian parasites do not l...
Offspring of parents who were separated and not speaking to one another have ...
by Michael L. M. Murphy, Sheldon Cohen, Denise Janicki-Deverts, William J. Doyle
20 Jun 2017 at 12:04pm
Exposure to parental separation or divorce during childhood has been associated with an increased risk for physical morbidity during adulthood. Here we tested the hypothesis that this association is primarily attributable to separated parents who do not communicate with each other. We also examined ...

Science

[Research Articles] Targeting factor D of the alternative complement pathway ...
by Yaspan, B. L., Williams, D. F., Holz, F. G., Regillo, C. D., Li, Z., Dressen, A., van Lookeren Campagne, M., Le, K. N., Graham, R. R., Beres, T., Bhangale, T. R., Honigberg, L. A., Smith, A., Henry, E. C., Ho, C., Strauss, E. C., for the MAHALO Study Investigators
21 Jun 2017 at 1:49pm

Geographic atrophy is an advanced form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and a leading cause of vision loss for which there are no approved treatments. Genetic studies in AMD patients have implicated dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway in the pathogenesis of geographic atroph...


[Editors' Choice] "AMP"(K)ed up recovery from ischemia-reperfusion injury
by Levi, B.
21 Jun 2017 at 1:49pm

Aging decreases tolerance to ischemia-reperfusion injury, which is mitigated by sestrin2-driven substrate metabolism.


[Research Articles] The long noncoding RNA Wisper controls cardiac fibrosis a...
by Micheletti, R., Plaisance, I., Abraham, B. J., Sarre, A., Ting, C.-C., Alexanian, M., Maric, D., Maison, D., Nemir, M., Young, R. A., Schroen, B., Gonzalez, A., Ounzain, S., Pedrazzini, T.
21 Jun 2017 at 1:49pm

Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as powerful regulators of cardiac development and disease. However, our understanding of the importance of these molecules in cardiac fibrosis is limited. Using an integrated genomic screen, we identified Wisper (Wisp2 super-enhancer–associated RNA) a...


[Research Articles] Targeting factor D of the alternative complement pathway ...
by Yaspan, B. L., Williams, D. F., Holz, F. G., Regillo, C. D., Li, Z., Dressen, A., van Lookeren Campagne, M., Le, K. N., Graham, R. R., Beres, T., Bhangale, T. R., Honigberg, L. A., Smith, A., Henry, E. C., Ho, C., Strauss, E. C., for the MAHALO Study Investigators
21 Jun 2017 at 1:49pm

Geographic atrophy is an advanced form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and a leading cause of vision loss for which there are no approved treatments. Genetic studies in AMD patients have implicated dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway in the pathogenesis of geographic atroph...


[Editors' Choice] "AMP"(K)ed up recovery from ischemia-reperfusion injury
by Levi, B.
21 Jun 2017 at 1:49pm

Aging decreases tolerance to ischemia-reperfusion injury, which is mitigated by sestrin2-driven substrate metabolism.


[Research Articles] The long noncoding RNA Wisper controls cardiac fibrosis a...
by Micheletti, R., Plaisance, I., Abraham, B. J., Sarre, A., Ting, C.-C., Alexanian, M., Maric, D., Maison, D., Nemir, M., Young, R. A., Schroen, B., Gonzalez, A., Ounzain, S., Pedrazzini, T.
21 Jun 2017 at 1:49pm

Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as powerful regulators of cardiac development and disease. However, our understanding of the importance of these molecules in cardiac fibrosis is limited. Using an integrated genomic screen, we identified Wisper (Wisp2 super-enhancer–associated RNA) a...


[Reports] Functional neuroimaging of high-risk 6-month-old infants predicts a...
by Emerson, R. W., Adams, C., Nishino, T., Hazlett, H. C., Wolff, J. J., Zwaigenbaum, L., Constantino, J. N., Shen, M. D., Swanson, M. R., Elison, J. T., Kandala, S., Estes, A. M., Botteron, K. N., Collins, L., Dager, S. R., Evans, A. C., Gerig, G., Gu, H., McKinstry, R. C., Paterson, S., Schultz, R. T., Styner, M., IBIS Network, Schlaggar, B. L., Pruett, J. R., Piven, J.
7 Jun 2017 at 2:00pm

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social deficits and repetitive behaviors that typically emerge by 24 months of age. To develop effective early interventions that can potentially ameliorate the defining deficits of ASD and improve long-term outcomes, e...


[Research Articles] The effects of treatment failure generalize across differ...
by Zunhammer, M., Ploner, M., Engelbrecht, C., Bock, J., Kessner, S. S., Bingel, U.
7 Jun 2017 at 2:00pm

Failure of medical treatments can hamper responses to subsequent treatments. It has been suggested that changing the route of drug administration could reduce such negative carry-over effects, but direct evidence for this approach is lacking. We therefore investigated in 211 healthy volunteers wheth...


[Research Articles] Radiation therapy primes tumors for nanotherapeutic deliv...
by Miller, M. A., Chandra, R., Cuccarese, M. F., Pfirschke, C., Engblom, C., Stapleton, S., Adhikary, U., Kohler, R. H., Mohan, J. F., Pittet, M. J., Weissleder, R.
31 May 2017 at 1:51pm

Efficient delivery of therapeutic nanoparticles (TNPs) to tumors is critical in improving efficacy, yet strategies that universally maximize tumoral targeting by TNP modification have been difficult to achieve in the clinic. Instead of focusing on TNP optimization, we show that the tumor microenviro...


[Editors' Choice] Rapamycin keeps the reproductive clock ticking
by Hine, C.
31 May 2017 at 1:51pm

Two weeks of rapamycin administration in young and old female mice leads to long-term improvements in ovarian function and reproductive longevity.


[Research Articles] Complement C3 deficiency protects against neurodegenerati...
by Shi, Q., Chowdhury, S., Ma, R., Le, K. X., Hong, S., Caldarone, B. J., Stevens, B., Lemere, C. A.
31 May 2017 at 1:51pm

The complement cascade not only is an innate immune response that enables removal of pathogens but also plays an important role in microglia-mediated synaptic refinement during brain development. Complement C3 is elevated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), colocalizing with neuritic plaques, and app...


Reconfiguration of DNA molecular arrays driven by information relay
by Song, J., Li, Z., Wang, P., Meyer, T., Mao, C., Ke, Y.
22 Jun 2017 at 1:36pm

Information relay at the molecular level is an essential phenomenon in numerous chemical and biological processes, such as intricate signaling cascades. One key challenge in synthetic molecular self-assembly is to construct artificial structures that imitate these complex behaviors in controllable s...


Ratchet-like polypeptide translocation mechanism of the AAA+ disaggregase Hsp104
by Gates, S. N., Yokom, A. L., Lin, J., Jackrel, M. E., Rizo, A. N., Kendsersky, N. M., Buell, C. E., Sweeny, E. A., Mack, K. L., Chuang, E., Torrente, M. P., Su, M., Shorter, J., Southworth, D. R.
15 Jun 2017 at 1:35pm

Hsp100 polypeptide translocases are conserved AAA+ machines that maintain proteostasis by unfolding aberrant and toxic proteins for refolding or proteolytic degradation. The Hsp104 disaggregase from S. cerevisiae solubilizes stress-induced amorphous aggregates and amyloid. The structural basis for s...


Single-proton spin detection by diamond magnetometry
by Loretz, M., Rosskopf, T., Boss, J. M., Pezzagna, S., Meijer, J., Degen, C. L.
8 Jan 2015 at 2:55pm

Extending magnetic resonance imaging to the atomic scale has been a long-standing aspiration, driven by the prospect of directly mapping atomic positions in molecules with three-dimensional spatial resolution. We report detection of individual, isolated proton spins by a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center...


A Single Molecular Spin Valve
by Schon, Emberly, Kirczenow
18 Apr 2002 at 2:53pm

The charge transport through a single benzene-1,4-dithiolate molecule embedded in an inert matrix of insulating alkanethiol molecules and sandwiched between ferromagnetic electrodes is studied as a function of magnetic field. Electronic transport through the device structure shows a pronounced spin ...



British Medical Journal


New England Journal of Medicine

Biomarkers and Aging in the News

Older fathers have 'geekier sons'
They are more focused, intelligent and less bothered about fitting in, say scientists.
20 Jun 2017 at 11:46am
Prisoners cover axed meals on wheels for the elderly
Home-delivered meals for the elderly are cooked by prisoners after a council scraps the service.
20 Jun 2017 at 1:21am
Coconut oil 'as unhealthy as beef fat and butter'
It is packed with saturated fat which can raise "bad" cholesterol and pose a heart risk, say US experts.
16 Jun 2017 at 6:50am
Today is International Widows Day and these are their stories
From a Syrian refugee to a military widow in the United States, these are their stories of loss, grief and survival.
23 Jun 2017 at 10:51am
Can sitting cancel out the benefits of exercise?
You've probably heard the trendy phrase that "sitting is the new smoking." Although it's an exaggeration to equate the two behaviors -- nothing comes close to smoking in its many ruinous and deadly effects on the body -- research does show that prolonged sitting may be harmful, even if you exercise regularly.
22 Jun 2017 at 6:02am

[CaRP] XML error: Mismatched tag at line 4
Ask Well: Do M.R.I. Scans Cause Any Harm?
Magnetic resonance imaging doesn?t carry the radiation risks of X-rays or PET scans. But there are safety issues to watch out for.
23 Jun 2017 at 6:00am
PUBLIC HEALTH: G.O.P. Health Plan Is Really a Rollback of Medicaid
Limiting the amount that the federal government would pay for each person would leave states with difficult choices, and would be a fundamental shift of financial risk.
21 Jun 2017 at 5:12am

[CaRP] php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known (0)
Melanoma cases rising; young women at greatest risk
Study says that could be because they are more likely to use tanning beds than men.        
2 Apr 2012 at 10:15am
Long use of any hormones raises women's breast cancer risk
A new study tracked about 60,000 nurses and found that use of any kind of hormones for 10 years or more slightly raised the chances.        
1 Apr 2012 at 1:28pm
Radiation may up breast cancer risk in some women
Mammograms might raise the chances of developing cancer in young women whose genes put them at higher risk, a study suggests.        
6 Sep 2012 at 6:30pm
U.N.: Chemicals damaging health and environment
The report by the U.N. Environment Program warned that the increasing production of chemicals is increasing health costs.        
6 Sep 2012 at 11:25am
Study: Ginkgo doesn't prevent Alzheimer's disease
Taking ginkgo biloba didn't prevent Alzheimer's disease in older adults, according to the biggest prevention study in Europe.       
5 Sep 2012 at 10:34pm
University pulls Kinsey Institute app over privacy concerns
The Kinsey Institute released a new mobile app that allows users to report on sexual behavior and experiences.       
5 Sep 2012 at 9:43pm
War might be making young bodies old
A VA study finds that veterans in their 20s and 30s show signs of premature aging.       
5 Sep 2012 at 5:56pm
Rural Tennessee doctor fears proposed Medicaid cuts
One estimate says 37 more Tennessee hospitals risk major cuts or closure under the Senate health care bill
23 Jun 2017 at 11:35pm
Doctor in rural Tennessee worries about health care bill's effects
One in five Tennesseans rely on Medicaid, including half of Tennessee children living in small towns and rural areas. One estimate says 37 more Tennessee hospitals risk major cuts or closure under the Senate health care bill. Mark Strassmann reports.
24 Jun 2017 at 12:02am
Keep your pet safe from summer health hazards
The warmer weather brings with it health risks for pets. Here's how to keep them safe
23 Jun 2017 at 9:33pm
Burns from hot pavement, cars up due to heat wave
As temperatures near 120 degrees in the Southwest, people are at risk of suffering contact burns
23 Jun 2017 at 6:10pm
Woman speaks out about suffering heart attack at 40
New study found that 74 percent of women reported having at least one risk factor for heart disease; Only 16 percent were told by their doctor that they were at risk
22 Jun 2017 at 9:36pm
Study finds many American women unaware of risk for heart disease
Heart disease kills more American women than cancer, yet many don't discuss the dangers with their doctors. A new report found that 74 percent of women reported having at least one risk factor for heart disease, but only 16 percent were told by their doctor that they were at risk. Mireya Villarreal reports.
23 Jun 2017 at 12:22am
Many women don't recognize common, fatal ailment
Heart disease kills more than all cancers combined, but new research finds many women aren't aware of the risk
23 Jun 2017 at 1:06pm
Medigap supplemental coverage can be too pricey for younger Medicare benefici...
One night three years ago, Joe Hobson finished reading a book, went to sleep and woke up blind. The problem, caused by a rare hereditary disease, forced him to give up his 20-year communications job, along with its generous health insurance. Now 63, the Arlington man is covered by Medicare, the f...
7 Mar 2011 at 6:32pm
Type 2 diabetes surges in people younger than 20
U.S. cases in those under 20 have grown from almost zero to tens of thousands in just over a decade.
22 Mar 2011 at 3:48pm
Fear is potent risk of Japanese nuclear crisis
The psychological impact of Japanese nuclear crisis could turn out to be significant
15 Mar 2011 at 5:31am
How men and women exercise differently
No one wants to think she's a cliche. But it's time for me to recognize that when it comes to my gym behavior, that's exactly what I am: a cardio-loving woman who has to be forced to hoist a dumbbell.
1 Mar 2011 at 11:59am
Many Americans have poor health literacy
An elderly woman sent home from the hospital develops a life-threatening infection because she doesn't understand the warning signs listed in the discharge instructions. A man flummoxed by an intake form in a doctor's office reflexively writes "no" to every question because he doesn't understand ...
28 Feb 2011 at 8:37pm
'Policy Review' essay covers PTSD; veteran benefits
How could a Veterans Administration rule making it easier for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to file disability claims be a bad thing? In a "Policy Review" essay called "PTSD's Diagnostic Trap," psychiatrist and Yale University School of Medicine lecturer Sally Satel argues that ful...
21 Feb 2011 at 11:47am
Women are more likely than men to give up sleep to care for children and others
Call it the real night shift - that noctural period when bleary-eyed adults leave warm beds to tend to the needs of sick kids, elderly parents, an ailing spouse or incontinent pet. So, who takes the night shift: Mom or Dad?
14 Feb 2011 at 8:22pm
Enrollment in high-risk insurance pools lagging behind predictions
More Americans have been signing up for special health plans designed for people with medical problems that caused them to be spurned by the insurance industry, according to new government figures. But enrollment continues to lag significantly behind original predictions.
10 Feb 2011 at 9:35pm
The Surprising Perks of Being an Older Parent
A new study says older dads raise 'geekier' kids, plus five other perks of being an older parent.
23 Jun 2017 at 8:58am
Key Senate Conservatives Won't Support GOP Health Care Bill Yet
Four key Republican senators announced they will not vote for the GOP health care bill unless changes are made, putting passage of the bill at risk.
23 Jun 2017 at 7:16am
Women Skipping Doctor Visits To Lose Weight First
Nearly half of U.S. women don't realize heart disease is their top health risk, and many admit to skipping clinic visits because they want to lose weight first.
22 Jun 2017 at 8:05pm

[CaRP] XML error: > required at line 25
Ask Well: Do M.R.I. Scans Cause Any Harm?
Magnetic resonance imaging doesn?t carry the radiation risks of X-rays or PET scans. But there are safety issues to watch out for.
23 Jun 2017 at 6:00am
PUBLIC HEALTH: G.O.P. Health Plan Is Really a Rollback of Medicaid
Limiting the amount that the federal government would pay for each person would leave states with difficult choices, and would be a fundamental shift of financial risk.
21 Jun 2017 at 5:12am
Packaging without nucleosomes
22 Jun 2017 at 1:20pm
On the generation of solar spicules and Alfvenic waves

In the lower solar atmosphere, the chromosphere is permeated by jets known as spicules, in which plasma is propelled at speeds of 50 to 150 kilometers per second into the corona. The origin of the spicules is poorly understood, although they are expected to play a role in heating the million-degree corona and are associated with Alfvénic waves that help drive the solar wind. We compare magnetohydrodynamic simulations of spicules with observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrog...


22 Jun 2017 at 1:20pm
Local protein kinase A action proceeds through intact holoenzymes

Hormones can transmit signals through adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) to precise intracellular locations. The fidelity of these responses relies on the activation of localized protein kinase A (PKA) holoenzymes. Association of PKA regulatory type II (RII) subunits with A-kinase–anchoring proteins (AKAPs) confers location, and catalytic (C) subunits phosphorylate substrates. Single-particle electron microscopy demonstrated that AKAP79 constrains RII-C subassemblies within 150 to 250 an...


22 Jun 2017 at 1:20pm
An environment-dependent transcriptional network specifies human microglia id...

Microglia play essential roles in central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis and influence diverse aspects of neuronal function. However, the transcriptional mechanisms that specify human microglia phenotypes are largely unknown. We examined the transcriptomes and epigenetic landscapes of human microglia isolated from surgically resected brain tissue ex vivo and after transition to an in vitro environment. Transfer to a tissue culture environment resulted in rapid and extensive down-regulation of ...


22 Jun 2017 at 1:20pm
Expert Panel: Three Things May Save Your Brain
New study finds encouraging signs that exercise, managing blood pressure, and brain training may combat dementia.
22 Jun 2017 at 2:17pm
Do Older Dads Produce Brainy Boys?
Study finds their sons score high in intelligence and focus
21 Jun 2017 at 10:15am
When Is Risk Highest for Women With BRCA Gene?
Study narrows down peak times, possibly aiding in preventive treatment decisions
20 Jun 2017 at 6:15pm
Hair Dyes Tied to Higher Breast Cancer Risk
Study findings differ by race, but one expert says they're inconclusive
20 Jun 2017 at 4:15pm
Why Yoga, Tai Chi and Meditation Are Good for You
Mind-body interventions reverse DNA reactions that cause stress, study suggests
16 Jun 2017 at 8:15pm
Healthy Dietary Fats Help Beat High Cholesterol
Eating them can reduce your risk of heart disease as effectively as statins, heart experts say
15 Jun 2017 at 6:15pm
Higher Birth Defect Risk if Mom is Obese
But researchers say absolute risk is low
15 Jun 2017 at 4:15pm
Parent?s Smartphone Use Can Affect Kids' Behavior
Parenting, devices, Child development, Smartphones, cell phone,
15 Jun 2017 at 10:15am

[CaRP] php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known (0)
Molecule induces lifesaving sleep in worms
Sometimes, a nematode worm just needs to take a nap. In fact, its life may depend on it. New research has identified a protein that promotes a sleep-like state in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Without the snooze-inducing molecule, worms are more likely to die when confronted with stressful conditions.
7 Mar 2016 at 10:57am
Group identifications affect likelihood of teenagers smoking, drinking and ta...
Teenagers who interact positively with their family, school and friends are far less likely to smoke, binge drink and use cannabis than peers who fail to identify with these social groups, according to research. The research team surveyed more than 1000 high school pupils aged 13-17 from the Fife area. The results showed that group identification protects against adverse health behavior, with levels of identification with family, school and friendship groups predicting the likelihood of teenager...
7 Mar 2016 at 9:36am
Goldilocks had it right: When it comes to sleep, neither too much or too litt...
Too much or too little sleep is linked with an increased risk of certain types of cardiovascular disease. Women and the elderly are particularly at risk, report scientists in a new report.
7 Mar 2016 at 9:36am
Technology to analyze customer behavior in stores
Proximus has developed technology for creating a map of how we shop in the supermarket thanks to a chip that is built into shopping carts and baskets.
7 Mar 2016 at 9:35am
Time to rethink your vegetable oil?
Risk of heart disease and diabetes may be lowered by a diet higher in a lipid found in grapeseed and other oils, but not in olive oil, a new study suggests. This finding could have obvious implications in preventing heart disease and diabetes, but also could be important for older adults because higher lean body mass can contribute to a longer life with more independence.
7 Mar 2016 at 9:23am
Young baseball players could benefit from preseason arm injury prevention pro...
Preseason prevention programs are beneficial to young baseball pitchers, according to new research. The study, the first to analyze a well-monitored preseason training program, showed numerous arm flexibility and strength improvements in participating athletes that could ultimately diminish the risk of injuries.
5 Mar 2016 at 11:18am
Latin dancing may have health benefits for older adults
A Latin dance program was more effective than health education alone in boosting older Latinos' physical fitness. After four months of dancing, participants were able to complete a 400-meter walk faster and increased their leisure physical activity level.
4 Mar 2016 at 9:57pm
Does a 'Western diet' increase risk of Alzheimer's disease?
New research provides insight into the role of the western diet in Alzheimer?s disease.
4 Mar 2016 at 4:48pm
Woodpecker drumming signals wimp or warrior
Instead of a distinctive song, woodpeckers bang on trees with their bills to create a sound called drumming. In a new study, researchers tested how woodpecker pairs perceived drumming to see how it influenced territorial interaction and coordination of defensive behavior.
4 Mar 2016 at 4:36pm
Marine protected areas intensify both cooperation and competition
Marine protected areas generate both extreme cooperation and extreme competition among commercial fishers. When these behaviors remain in balance, they can lead to better conservation of marine resources, a new study finds. However, if competition among fishers increases while cooperation declines, it could threaten the long-term survival of marine protected areas, their biodiversity and the communities that depend on them.
4 Mar 2016 at 4:04pm
Eating peanut in early years helps reduce risk of allergy even with later abs...
The early introduction of peanut to the diets of infants at high-risk of developing peanut allergy significantly reduces the risk of peanut allergy until 6 years of age, even if they stop eating peanut around the age of five, according to a new study.
4 Mar 2016 at 4:04pm

[CaRP] php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known (0)
Special cells explain why cabbage and stress churn your guts
When a type of cell in the intestine detects dietary irritants and stress hormones, it sends distress signals to the brain, telling it to move things along
22 Jun 2017 at 1:00pm
Italy?s drying lakes imperil rare shrimp species found only here
The survival of ancient and unique species thriving in mountain lakes in central Italy have been threatened by a double whammy of a quake and climate change
22 Jun 2017 at 12:22pm
5 kilograms of broccoli in a pill slashes diabetics? blood sugar
A concentrated broccoli extract taken daily helps people with type-2 diabetes reduce blood glucose by 10 per cent ? lowering their risk of other complications
19 Jun 2017 at 1:15pm
Mindfulness and meditation dampen down inflammation genes
Mind-body practices like yoga relieve stress, but do they also make you healthier? An analysis of 18 trials suggest they might, through changes in gene activity
19 Jun 2017 at 10:30am
Cub photo raises hope for Europe?s rarest and largest wild cat
A rare subspecies of Eurasian lynx, the Balkan lynx, numbers less than 50 individuals ? but a newborn has just been found in the wild, raising hopes for the species' survival
13 Jun 2017 at 8:56am
Ocean plastics from Haiti?s beaches turned into laptop packaging
Laptop packaging is an unlikely new destination for plastic otherwise destined for oceans ? but will it make a difference to the clean-up efforts?
12 Jun 2017 at 12:34pm
Placenta Accreta Health Risks: Doctor Explains Condition Behind Kim Kardashia...
After complications during her last pregnancy, Kim Kardashian plans on having a surrogate carry her next child.
23 Jun 2017 at 2:14pm

[CaRP] php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known (0)
School Safety Tips For Younger Kids
School is back in session, so take some time to go over these important safety tips with your children. This is just the beginning of the conversation, but it's a great place to get started.
21 Jul 2014 at 8:00am
Expert Panel: Three Things May Save Your Brain
New study finds encouraging signs that exercise, managing blood pressure, and brain training may combat dementia.
22 Jun 2017 at 2:17pm
Do Older Dads Produce Brainy Boys?
Study finds their sons score high in intelligence and focus
21 Jun 2017 at 10:15am
When Is Risk Highest for Women With BRCA Gene?
Study narrows down peak times, possibly aiding in preventive treatment decisions
20 Jun 2017 at 6:15pm
Hair Dyes Tied to Higher Breast Cancer Risk
Study findings differ by race, but one expert says they're inconclusive
20 Jun 2017 at 4:15pm
Why Yoga, Tai Chi and Meditation Are Good for You
Mind-body interventions reverse DNA reactions that cause stress, study suggests
16 Jun 2017 at 8:15pm
Healthy Dietary Fats Help Beat High Cholesterol
Eating them can reduce your risk of heart disease as effectively as statins, heart experts say
15 Jun 2017 at 6:15pm
Higher Birth Defect Risk if Mom is Obese
But researchers say absolute risk is low
15 Jun 2017 at 4:15pm
Parent?s Smartphone Use Can Affect Kids' Behavior
Parenting, devices, Child development, Smartphones, cell phone,
15 Jun 2017 at 10:15am
Medigap supplemental coverage can be too pricey for younger Medicare benefici...
One night three years ago, Joe Hobson finished reading a book, went to sleep and woke up blind. The problem, caused by a rare hereditary disease, forced him to give up his 20-year communications job, along with its generous health insurance. Now 63, the Arlington man is covered by Medicare, the f...
7 Mar 2011 at 6:32pm
Type 2 diabetes surges in people younger than 20
U.S. cases in those under 20 have grown from almost zero to tens of thousands in just over a decade.
22 Mar 2011 at 3:48pm
Fear is potent risk of Japanese nuclear crisis
The psychological impact of Japanese nuclear crisis could turn out to be significant
15 Mar 2011 at 5:31am
How men and women exercise differently
No one wants to think she's a cliche. But it's time for me to recognize that when it comes to my gym behavior, that's exactly what I am: a cardio-loving woman who has to be forced to hoist a dumbbell.
1 Mar 2011 at 11:59am
Many Americans have poor health literacy
An elderly woman sent home from the hospital develops a life-threatening infection because she doesn't understand the warning signs listed in the discharge instructions. A man flummoxed by an intake form in a doctor's office reflexively writes "no" to every question because he doesn't understand ...
28 Feb 2011 at 8:37pm
'Policy Review' essay covers PTSD; veteran benefits
How could a Veterans Administration rule making it easier for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to file disability claims be a bad thing? In a "Policy Review" essay called "PTSD's Diagnostic Trap," psychiatrist and Yale University School of Medicine lecturer Sally Satel argues that ful...
21 Feb 2011 at 11:47am
Women are more likely than men to give up sleep to care for children and others
Call it the real night shift - that noctural period when bleary-eyed adults leave warm beds to tend to the needs of sick kids, elderly parents, an ailing spouse or incontinent pet. So, who takes the night shift: Mom or Dad?
14 Feb 2011 at 8:22pm
Enrollment in high-risk insurance pools lagging behind predictions
More Americans have been signing up for special health plans designed for people with medical problems that caused them to be spurned by the insurance industry, according to new government figures. But enrollment continues to lag significantly behind original predictions.
10 Feb 2011 at 9:35pm

[CaRP] php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known (0)
Chocolate may be good medicine for reducing the risk of an irregular heartbea...

Medical researchers have identified a compound that may reduce your risk of a dangerous type of heart rhythm that can lead to strokes, dementia, heart failure and early death.

In a study of more than 55,000 Danish men and women who were tracked for up to 16 years, people who used this compound...


24 May 2017 at 3:05pm
9 ways to reduce your risk of Alzheimer?s

The statistics on women and Alzheimer?s disease are startling.

Every 66 seconds someone in the U.S. develops Alzheimer?s. Two-thirds are women, according to the Alzheimer?s Assn.

Women in their 60s are more than twice as likely to develop Alzheimer?s over the course of their lives as they are to...


2 Jun 2017 at 7:30pm
Could Prozac be a treatment for children with autism?

After drinking mother?s milk spiked with the antidepressant Prozac for 19 days, infant mice bred to mimic the distinctive behaviors and brain abnormalities seen in autism experienced dramatic improvements in their social interactions, communication patterns and a wide range of neurochemical peculiarities...


22 Jun 2017 at 1:20pm

NIH Press Releases



[CaRP] php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known (0)
NIH News Release
NIH News Release
News releases from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Affective neuroscience expert Dr. Richard Davidson to speak on meditation res...
20 Apr 2016 at 1:00pm
NCCIH presents ?Change Your Brain by Transforming Your Mind?.


NIH study finds factors that may influence influenza vaccine effectiveness
19 Apr 2016 at 8:30pm
Long-held approach to predicting seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness may need to be revisited.


Statement on Review of NIH Sterile Production Facilities
19 Apr 2016 at 8:15pm
Production suspended in two facilities.


NCI opens online platform to submit ideas about research for Cancer Moonshot
18 Apr 2016 at 8:15pm
Submissions will be considered by a panel of scientific experts and patient advocates.


Healthy diet may reduce high blood pressure risk after gestational diabetes, ...
18 Apr 2016 at 8:00pm
Women who have had gestational diabetes may indeed benefit from a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.


NIH launches research program to reduce health disparities in surgical outcomes
18 Apr 2016 at 3:00pm
The initiative will involve collaborations among several NIH institutes and centers, AHRQ.


Islet transplantation restores blood sugar awareness and control in type 1 di...
18 Apr 2016 at 2:00pm
NIH-funded study lays groundwork for potential application submission to FDA for licensure of islet preparation.


Greenness around homes linked to lower mortality
15 Apr 2016 at 4:00pm
Researchers found the biggest differences in death rates from kidney disease, respiratory disease, and cancer.


NIH sequences genome of a fungus that causes life-threatening pneumonia
11 Apr 2016 at 3:00pm
Pneumocystis was one of the first infections that led to the initial recognition of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.


New role identified for scars at the site of injured spinal cord
7 Apr 2016 at 7:00pm
NIH-funded mouse study suggests scar formation may help, not hinder, nerve regrowth.


NIH Announcements


[CaRP] php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known (0)
NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA)
Weekly Funding Opportunities and Policy Notices from the National Institutes of Health.

Notice of Intent to Publish a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Conformanc...
12 Dec 2016 at 11:52am
Notice NOT-FD-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Reminder: NHLBI FY2017 Small Business Topics of Special Interest (TOSI) for t...
12 Dec 2016 at 11:48am
Notice NOT-HL-16-479 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Notice of Extension of the Expiration Date for PA-16-282 Developing New Clini...
12 Dec 2016 at 1:25am
Notice NOT-HS-17-005 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Notice of an Informational Webinar for RFA-NS-17-017 "Frontotemporal Degenera...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:09am
Notice NOT-NS-17-010 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory - Pragmatic Clinical Trials Demonstr...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:33am
Funding Opportunity RFA-AT-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this FOA is to solicit UG3/UH3 phased cooperative agreement research applications to conduct efficient, large-scale pragmatic clinical trial Demonstration Projects within the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and other co-morbid conditions in U.S. military personnel, veterans and their families. This program will be referred to as the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory program. Awards made under this FOA will initially support a two-year milestone-driven planning phase (UG3), with possible transition to a pragmatic trial Demonstration Project implementation phase (UH3). UG3 projects that have met the scientific milestone and feasibility requirements may transition to the UH3 phase. The UG3/UH3 application must be submitted as a single application, following the instructions described in this FOA. The overall goal of this initiative, jointly supported by the NIH, DoD, and VA, is to develop the capacity to implement cost-effective large-scale clinical research in military and veteran health care delivery organizations focusing on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and other comorbid conditions. The NIH, DoD, and VA expect to: establish a Coordinating Center that will provide national leadership and technical expertise for all aspects of health care system (HCS_- focused research including assistance to UG3/UH3 grant applicants. Primary outcomes of treatment interventions include assessing pain and pain reduction, ability to function in daily life, quality of life, and medication usage/reduction/discontinuation. Secondary outcomes focusing on assessing comorbid conditions or those co-occurring with high frequency in this population are also of interest under the FOA.
NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory - Coordinating Center (U24)
12 Dec 2016 at 3:33am
Funding Opportunity RFA-AT-17-002 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this FOA is to solicit applications for a Coordinating Center (CC) to provide national leadership for the NIH-DoD-VA Health Care Systems (HCS) Research Collaboratory program on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and comorbidities in U.S. military personnel, veterans and their families. For brevity, this initiative will be referred to as the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory. Coordinating Center applicants will need to: 1) develop, adapt, and adopt technical and policy guidelines and best practices for the effective conduct of research in partnership with health care systems focused on military personnel, veterans, and their families; 2) work collaboratively with and provide technical, design, and other support to Demonstration Project teams, to develop and implement a pragmatic trial protocol; and 3) disseminate widely Collaboratory-endorsed policies and best practices and lessons learned in the Demonstration Projects for implementing research within health care settings. The Coordinating Center will also serve as the central resource for the activities of the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory program, including providing administrative support for a Steering Committee and its subcommittees.
Innovations for Healthy Living - Improving Population Health and Eliminating ...
12 Dec 2016 at 12:04pm
Funding Opportunity RFA-MD-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant applications that propose to develop a product, process or service for commercialization with the aim of reducing disparities in healthcare access and health outcomes and in preventing disease and improving health in one or more NIH-defined health disparity population group(s). Appropriate technologies should be effective, affordable, culturally acceptable, and deliverable to racial/ethnic minorities, low-income and rural populations.
Technologies for Improving Minority Health and Eliminating Health Disparities...
12 Dec 2016 at 12:04pm
Funding Opportunity RFA-MD-17-002 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant applications that propose to develop a product, process or service for commercialization with the aim of reducing disparities in healthcare access and health outcomes in one or more NIH-defined health disparity population group(s). Appropriate technologies should be effective, affordable, culturally acceptable, and deliverable to racial/ethnic minorities, low-income and rural populations.
Novel Analytical Approaches for Metabolomics Data (R03)
12 Dec 2016 at 9:57am
Funding Opportunity RFA-RM-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this small research grant Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to foster collaboration between computational scientists, metabolomics experts, and biomedical researchers in developing, piloting, and/or validating novel bioinformatic approaches that address current analytical hurdles in metabolomics data. A goal of providing powerful approaches that will be useful to biomedical researchers, as well as bioinformaticians, is particularly encouraged. Projects are not intended to supplement ongoing metabolomics analyses, but to provide a tool for broader use by the biomedical research community. Projects are expected to use existing, publicly available metabolomics data and complement the efforts and resources of the Common Fund Metabolomics Program.
Utilizing Health Information Technology to Scale and Spread Successful Practi...
12 Dec 2016 at 10:39am
Funding Opportunity PA-17-077 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites R18 grant applications for research that demonstrates how health information technology (IT) can improve patient-centered health outcomes and quality of care in primary care and other ambulatory settings through the scale and spread of successful, health IT-enabled practice models that use patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures to achieve these objectives.
Administrative Supplement for Research on Sex/Gender Influences (Admin Supp)
12 Dec 2016 at 1:27am
Funding Opportunity PA-17-078 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) announces the availability of administrative supplements to support research highlighting the impact of sex/gender influences and/or sex and gender factors in human health and illness, including basic, preclinical, clinical and behavioral studies. Of special interest are studies relevant to understanding the significance of biological sex on cells and tissue explants; comparative studies of male and female tissues, organ systems and physiological systems; sex-based comparisons of pathophysiology, biomarkers, gene expression, clinical presentation and prevention and treatment of diseases. The most robust experimental designs include consideration of both sex and gender; therefore, applications proposing to investigate the influence of both sex and gender factors are highly encouraged. The proposed research must address at least one objective from Goals 1 through 3 of the NIH Strategic Plan for Women's Health Research.
Shared Instrumentation Grant (SIG) Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 10:19am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-074 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Shared Instrument Grant (SIG) Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems that cost at least $50,000. There is no maximum price requirement; however, the maximum award is $600,000. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffractometers, mass and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and light microscopes, cell sorters, and biomedical imagers.
Shared Instrumentation for Animal Research (SIFAR) Grant Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 11:23am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-075 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Shared Instrumentation for Animal Research (SIFAR) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-funded investigators to purchase or upgrade scientific instruments necessary to carry out animal experiments in all areas of biomedical research supported by the NIH. Applicants may request clusters of commercially available instruments configured as specialized integrated systems or as series of instruments to support a thematic workflow in a well-defined area of research using animals or related materials. Priority will be given to specialized clusters of instruments and to uniquely configured systems to support innovative and potentially transformative investigations. Requests for a single instrument will be considered only if the instrument is to be placed in a barrier facility. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) supports requests for state-of-the art commercially available technologies needed for NIH-funded research using any vertebrate and invertebrate animal species. It is expected that the use of the awarded instruments will enhance the scientific rigor of animal research and improve the reproducibility of experimental outcomes. One item of the requested instrumentation must cost at least $50,000. No instrument in a cluster can cost less than $20,000. There is no maximum price requirement; however, the maximum award is $750,000.
High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 12:15pm
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-076 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems that cost at least $600,001. The maximum award is $2,000,000. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffraction systems, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and confocal microscopes, cell-sorters, and biomedical imagers.
Increasing the Use of Medications for the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorders ...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:26am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-079 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages health services research designed to increase the public health impact of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmacotherapies for the treatment of alcohol use disorder. Significant progress is needed in developing generalizable, scalable, cost-effective strategies to move these evidence-based interventions into the mainstream of alcohol use disorder treatment, in both general medical and specialty care settings. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) seeks applications to conduct hypothesis-driven research to identify effective methods for increasing the utilization of currently-available medications, by addressing their acceptability (to prescribers and patients), perceived effectiveness, affordability, and feasibility of use within existing care delivery systems.