Aging, Longevity and Health in the News


Nature: Current issue

How Trump?s science cuts could hurt states that voted for him
by Alexandra Witze
17 May 2017 at 12:00am
Rural and struggling areas have benefited from funding that is now at risk.
China cracks down on fake data in drug trials
by David Cyranoski
11 May 2017 at 12:00am
Researchers and manufacturers face possible jail time ? or execution ? for fraudulent submissions to nation's drug agency.
Inequality: Live poor, die young
by Abigail A. Sewell
17 May 2017 at 12:00am
Abigail A. Sewell examines a physician's study of how deprivation shortens lifespan.
Global health: Boost multinational clinical research
by Jacques Demotes-Mainard
17 May 2017 at 12:00am
Global cooperation in clinical research maximizes access to patients, enables resource sharing and increases the applicability of research findings. Yet academic trials are rarely multinational because they are beset with funding problems and variations in legal, regulatory and ethical requirements....
Work?life balance: Break or burn out
by Kendall Powell
17 May 2017 at 12:00am
Taking time off from work is crucial for avoiding stress and depression, and their potential consequences.
Ageing: Tools to eliminate senescent cells
by Manuel Serrano
10 May 2017 at 12:00am
Ageing and many diseases are partly driven by the accumulation of damaged cells that no longer divide. It emerges that these senescent cells can be eradicated in mice using a drug that interferes with the activity of the protein FOXO4.
Topological defects control collective dynamics in neural progenitor cell cul...
by Kyogo KawaguchiRyoichiro KageyamaMasaki Sano
12 Apr 2017 at 12:00am
Cultured stem cells have become a standard platform not only for regenerative medicine and developmental biology but also for biophysical studies. Yet, the characterization of cultured stem cells at the level of morphology and of the macroscopic patterns resulting from cell-to-cell interactions rema...
Floor-plate-derived netrin-1 is dispensable for commissural axon guidance
by Chloé DominiciJuan Antonio Moreno-BravoSergi Roig PuiggrosQuentin RappeneauNicolas RamaPauline VieugueAgns BernetPatrick MehlenAlain Chédotal
26 Apr 2017 at 12:00am
Netrin-1 is an evolutionarily conserved, secreted extracellular matrix protein involved in axon guidance at the central nervous system midline. Netrin-1 is expressed by cells localized at the central nervous system midline, such as those of the floor plate in vertebrate embryos. Growth cone turning ...
Intratumoural heterogeneity generated by Notch signalling promotes small-cell...
by Jing Shan LimAlvaro IbasetaMarcus M. FischerBelinda CancillaGilbert O?YoungSandra CristeaVincent C. LucaDian YangNadine S. JahchanCécile HamardMartine AntoineMarie WislezChristina KongJennifer CainYu-Wang LiuAnn M. KapounK. Christopher GarciaTimothy HoeyChristopher L. MurrielJulien Sage
10 May 2017 at 12:00am
The Notch signalling pathway mediates cell fate decisions and is tumour suppressive or oncogenic depending on the context. During lung development, Notch pathway activation inhibits the differentiation of precursor cells to a neuroendocrine fate. In small-cell lung cancer, an aggressive neuroendocri...

Scientific American: Current issue

Lost at Sea
by Danielle L. Dixson
16 May 2017 at 12:00am
Ocean acidification may alter the behaviors of underwater creatures in disastrous ways

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Reply to Candel et al.: Evidence for evolutionary conservation of folding kin...
by Franco O. Tzul, Daniel Vasilchuk, George I. Makhatadze
23 May 2017 at 3:19pm
The letter by Candel et al. (1) does not address a potential problem with their own experimental set-up. In particular, the use of guanidinium hydrochloride (GdnHCl) is not the best choice of denaturant for studying a folding reaction. There is an ample amount of evidence to suggest that the variati...
The wisdom of crowds for visual search [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
by Mordechai Z. Juni, Miguel P. Eckstein
23 May 2017 at 3:19pm
Decision-making accuracy typically increases through collective integration of people?s judgments into group decisions, a phenomenon known as the wisdom of crowds. For simple perceptual laboratory tasks, classic signal detection theory specifies the upper limit for collective integration benefits ob...
Shelterin components mediate genome reorganization in response to replication...
by Takeshi Mizuguchi, Nitika Taneja, Emiko Matsuda, Jon-Matthew Belton, Peter FitzGerald, Job Dekker, Shiv I. S. Grewal
23 May 2017 at 3:19pm
The dynamic nature of genome organization impacts critical nuclear functions including the regulation of gene expression, replication, and DNA damage repair. Despite significant progress, the mechanisms responsible for reorganization of the genome in response to cellular stress, such as aberrant DNA...
Microbiota promotes systemic T-cell survival through suppression of an apopto...
by Raymond Soto, Charisse Petersen, Camille L. Novis, Jason L. Kubinak, Rickesha Bell, W. Zac Stephens, Thomas E. Lane, Robert S. Fuȷinami, Alberto Bosque, Ryan M. O’Connell, June L. Round
23 May 2017 at 3:19pm
Symbiotic microbes impact the severity of a variety of diseases through regulation of T-cell development. However, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms by which this is accomplished. Here we report that a secreted factor, Erdr1, is regulated by the microbiota to control T-cell apoptosi...
Metaplasticity mechanisms restore plasticity and associativity in an animal m...
by Qin Li, Sheeja Navakkode, Martin Rothkegel, Tuck Wah Soong, Sreedharan Sajikumar, Martin Korte
23 May 2017 at 3:19pm
Dynamic regulation of plasticity thresholds in a neuronal population is critical for the formation of long-term plasticity and memory and is achieved by mechanisms such as metaplasticity. Metaplasticity tunes the synapses to undergo changes that are necessary prerequisites for memory storage under p...
Preferences for group dominance track and mediate the effects of macro-level ...
by Jonas R. Kunst, Ronald Fischer, Jim Sidanius, Lotte Thomsen
23 May 2017 at 3:19pm
Whether and how societal structures shape individual psychology is a foundational question of the social sciences. Combining insights from evolutionary biology, economy, and the political and psychological sciences, we identify a central psychological process that functions to sustain group-based hi...

Science

[Research Articles] Central-acting therapeutics alleviate respiratory weaknes...
by Foster, A. J., Platt, M. J., Huber, J. S., Eadie, A. L., Arkell, A. M., Romanova, N., Wright, D. C., Gillis, T. E., Murrant, C. L., Brunt, K. R., Simpson, J. A.
17 May 2017 at 1:56pm

Diaphragmatic weakness is a feature of heart failure (HF) associated with dyspnea and exertional fatigue. Most studies have focused on advanced stages of HF, leaving the cause unresolved. The long-standing theory is that pulmonary edema imposes a mechanical stress, resulting in diaphragmatic remodel...


[Editors' Choice] Turning back the clock
by Shoemaker, A. H.
17 May 2017 at 1:56pm

Increased DNA breaks in aging skeletal muscle activate the DNA-PK pathway, whereas blocking this pathway improves mitochondrial density, physical fitness, body weight, and insulin resistance in mice.


[Research Articles] Central-acting therapeutics alleviate respiratory weaknes...
by Foster, A. J., Platt, M. J., Huber, J. S., Eadie, A. L., Arkell, A. M., Romanova, N., Wright, D. C., Gillis, T. E., Murrant, C. L., Brunt, K. R., Simpson, J. A.
17 May 2017 at 1:56pm

Diaphragmatic weakness is a feature of heart failure (HF) associated with dyspnea and exertional fatigue. Most studies have focused on advanced stages of HF, leaving the cause unresolved. The long-standing theory is that pulmonary edema imposes a mechanical stress, resulting in diaphragmatic remodel...


[Editors' Choice] Turning back the clock
by Shoemaker, A. H.
17 May 2017 at 1:56pm

Increased DNA breaks in aging skeletal muscle activate the DNA-PK pathway, whereas blocking this pathway improves mitochondrial density, physical fitness, body weight, and insulin resistance in mice.


[Editors' Choice] The path of least antibiotic resistance
by Christenson, S. A.
10 May 2017 at 2:06pm

Antibiotic combination therapy alters Mycobacterium tuberculosis population dynamics in the human host.


[Editors' Choice] "TrkA"cking why "no pain, no gain" is the rule for bone for...
by Levi, B.
10 May 2017 at 2:06pm

Peripheral sensory nerves expressing TrkA innervate long bones and stimulate bone formation through the Wnt/β-catenin pathway when placed under stress.


[Editors' Choice] HIV-associated anaerobes ferment TB risk
by Philips, J. A.
10 May 2017 at 2:06pm

Short-chain fatty acids produced by anaerobic bacteria increase the risk of TB in HIV-infected, antiretroviral drug–treated people.


[Research Articles] Phenome-wide scanning identifies multiple diseases and di...
by Karnes, J. H., Bastarache, L., Shaffer, C. M., Gaudieri, S., Xu, Y., Glazer, A. M., Mosley, J. D., Zhao, S., Raychaudhuri, S., Mallal, S., Ye, Z., Mayer, J. G., Brilliant, M. H., Hebbring, S. J., Roden, D. M., Phillips, E. J., Denny, J. C.
10 May 2017 at 2:06pm

Although many phenotypes have been associated with variants in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, the full phenotypic impact of HLA variants across all diseases is unknown. We imputed HLA genomic variation from two populations of 28,839 and 8431 European ancestry individuals and tested association...


[Research Articles] A highly potent extended half-life antibody as a potentia...
by Zhu, Q., McLellan, J. S., Kallewaard, N. L., Ulbrandt, N. D., Palaszynski, S., Zhang, J., Moldt, B., Khan, A., Svabek, C., McAuliffe, J. M., Wrapp, D., Patel, N. K., Cook, K. E., Richter, B. W. M., Ryan, P. C., Yuan, A. Q., Suzich, J. A.
3 May 2017 at 2:06pm

Prevention of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) illness in all infants is a major public health priority. However, no vaccine is currently available to protect this vulnerable population. Palivizumab, the only approved agent for RSV prophylaxis, is limited to high-risk infants, and the cost associat...


[Research Articles] Nociceptive brain activity as a measure of analgesic effi...
by Hartley, C., Duff, E. P., Green, G., Mellado, G. S., Worley, A., Rogers, R., Slater, R.
3 May 2017 at 2:06pm

Pain in infants is undertreated and poorly understood, representing a major clinical problem. In part, this is due to our inability to objectively measure pain in nonverbal populations. We present and validate an electroencephalography-based measure of infant nociceptive brain activity that is evoke...


[Editors' Choice] The antisocial side of antibiotics
by Novarino, G.
26 Apr 2017 at 1:57pm

Perinatal exposure to penicillin may result in long-lasting gut and behavioral changes.


[Research Articles] Bone CLARITY: Clearing, imaging, and computational analys...
by Greenbaum, A., Chan, K. Y., Dobreva, T., Brown, D., Balani, D. H., Boyce, R., Kronenberg, H. M., McBride, H. J., Gradinaru, V.
26 Apr 2017 at 1:57pm

Bone tissue harbors unique and essential physiological processes, such as hematopoiesis, bone growth, and bone remodeling. To enable visualization of these processes at the cellular level in an intact environment, we developed "Bone CLARITY," a bone tissue clearing method. We used Bone CLARITY and a...


Resistance to malaria through structural variation of red blood cell invasion...
by Leffler, E. M., Band, G., Busby, G. B. J., Kivinen, K., Le, Q. S., Clarke, G. M., Bojang, K. A., Conway, D. J., Jallow, M., Sisay-Joof, F., Bougouma, E. C., Mangano, V. D., Modiano, D., Sirima, S. B., Achidi, E., Apinjoh, T. O., Marsh, K., Ndila, C. M., Peshu, N., Williams, T. N., Drakeley, C., Manjurano, A., Reyburn, H., Riley, E., Kachala, D., Molyneux, M., Nyirongo, V., Taylor, T., Thornton, N., Tilley, L., Grimsley, S., Drury, E., Stalker, J., Cornelius, V., Hubbart, C., Jeffreys, A. E., Rowlands, K., Rockett, K. A., Spencer, C. C. A., Kwiatkowski, D. P., Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network
18 May 2017 at 1:36pm

The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum invades human red blood cells via interactions between host and parasite surface proteins. By analyzing genome sequence data from human populations, including 1269 individuals from sub-Saharan Africa, we identify a diverse array of large copy number variant...


A maternal-effect selfish genetic element in Caenorhabditis elegans
by Ben-David, E., Burga, A., Kruglyak, L.
11 May 2017 at 1:37pm

Selfish genetic elements spread in natural populations and have an important role in genome evolution. We discovered a selfish element causing embryonic lethality in crosses between wild strains of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The element is made up of sup-35, a maternal-effect toxin that ki...


Dual-comb spectroscopy of water vapor with a free-running semiconductor disk ...
by Link, S. M., Maas, D. J. H. C., Waldburger, D., Keller, U.
11 May 2017 at 1:39pm

Dual-comb spectroscopy offers the potential for high accuracy combined with fast data acquisition. Applications are often limited, however, by the complexity of optical comb systems. Here we present dual-comb spectroscopy of water vapor using a substantially simplified single-laser system. Very good...


Ring attractor dynamics in the Drosophila central brain
by Kim, S. S., Rouault, H., Druckmann, S., Jayaraman, V.
4 May 2017 at 1:38pm

Ring attractors are a class of recurrent networks hypothesized to underlie the representation of heading direction. Such network structures, schematized as a ring of neurons whose connectivity depends on their heading preferences, can sustain a bump-like activity pattern whose location can be update...


Mapping the human DC lineage through the integration of high-dimensional tech...
by See, P., Dutertre, C.-A., Chen, J., Günther, P., McGovern, N., Irac, S. E., Gunawan, M., Beyer, M., Händler, K., Duan, K., Sumatoh, H. R. B., Ruffin, N., Jouve, M., Gea-Mallorqui, E., Hennekam, R. C. M., Lim, T., Yip, C. C., Wen, M., Malleret, B., Low, I., Shadan, N. B., Fen, C. F. S., Tay, A., Lum, J., Zolezzi, F., Larbi, A., Poidinger, M., Chan, J. K. Y., Chen, Q., Renia, L., Haniffa, M., Benaroch, P., Schlitzer, A., Schultze, J. L., Newell, E. W., Ginhoux, F.
4 May 2017 at 1:36pm

Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells that orchestrate immune responses. The human DC population comprises two main functionally specialized lineages, whose origins and differentiation pathways remain incompletely defined. Here, we combine two high-dimensional technologies&m...


Single-proton spin detection by diamond magnetometry
by Loretz, M., Rosskopf, T., Boss, J. M., Pezzagna, S., Meijer, J., Degen, C. L.
8 Jan 2015 at 2:55pm

Extending magnetic resonance imaging to the atomic scale has been a long-standing aspiration, driven by the prospect of directly mapping atomic positions in molecules with three-dimensional spatial resolution. We report detection of individual, isolated proton spins by a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center...


A Single Molecular Spin Valve
by Schon, Emberly, Kirczenow
18 Apr 2002 at 2:53pm

The charge transport through a single benzene-1,4-dithiolate molecule embedded in an inert matrix of insulating alkanethiol molecules and sandwiched between ferromagnetic electrodes is studied as a function of magnetic field. Electronic transport through the device structure shows a pronounced spin ...



British Medical Journal

Increasing regulation has unintended consequences
by Mayur Lakhani
23 May 2017 at 12:43pm
The Paterson case is an outrage. As a member of the medical profession, I was shocked and angry that a doctor could commit such heinous acts. The long term distress experienced by patients is...
Development and validation of QRISK3 risk prediction algorithms to estimate f...
by Julia Hippisley-Cox, Carol Coupland, Peter Brindle
23 May 2017 at 7:03pm
Objectives To develop and validate updated QRISK3 prediction algorithms to estimate the 10 year risk of cardiovascular disease in women and men accounting for potential new risk...

New England Journal of Medicine

Biomarkers and Aging in the News

'Half a glass of wine every day' increases breast cancer risk
That's what a report says - but we look at all the risks of breast cancer for women.
22 May 2017 at 7:09pm
Cigarettes sold in plain green packs under new rules
Standardised tobacco packaging rules come into force to try to put young people off smoking.
20 May 2017 at 7:35am
Report: A drink a day tied to higher breast cancer risk
23 May 2017 at 4:08am
7 ways to reduce your breast cancer risk
23 May 2017 at 4:06am
Low-dose aspirin linked to lower breast cancer risk, study says
More potential good news for people who regularly take a low-dose aspirin: Women who took one had a lower risk of breast cancer, according to a study published in the journal Breast Cancer Research on Monday.
1 May 2017 at 9:27am
How psychology affects recycling
When it comes to recycling, studies show that we can be easily swayed, and small details can produce big changes in behavior.
18 May 2017 at 5:12am

[CaRP] XML error: Mismatched tag at line 4
Why Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Eating chocolate may lower the risk for atrial fibrillation, the irregular heartbeat that can lead to stroke and heart failure.
23 May 2017 at 6:30pm
Warmer Weather Brings More Infections After Surgery
The risk of developing an infection at the site of a surgical wound increases during the summer months.
23 May 2017 at 12:45pm
The New Old Age: Planning to Age in Place? Find a Contractor Now
Virtually all single-family homes lack features needed to accommodate aging owners? limitations. But there are specialists prepared to help fix that.
19 May 2017 at 1:17pm
Some Social Scientists Are Tired of Asking for Permission
New federal rules may make it easier for researchers to conduct behavioral experiments. Critics worry that academics cannot judge whether their studies are harmful.
22 May 2017 at 1:28pm
The Checkup: The Science of Adolescent Sleep
Sleep deprivation is linked to behavioral and mental health problems and car accident risk, experts say, and starting school later could help.
22 May 2017 at 6:00am
Traveling Abroad? Get a Measles Shot
Adult travelers who are not immune to measles risk bringing home a highly contagious and sometimes fatal disease.
18 May 2017 at 5:00am
F.D.A. Warns of Faulty Lead Testing in Children and Mothers
The concern is that certain blood tests may have underestimated blood lead levels, providing false reassurance about risk for lead exposure.
17 May 2017 at 6:31pm

[CaRP] php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known (0)
Melanoma cases rising; young women at greatest risk
Study says that could be because they are more likely to use tanning beds than men.        
2 Apr 2012 at 10:15am
Long use of any hormones raises women's breast cancer risk
A new study tracked about 60,000 nurses and found that use of any kind of hormones for 10 years or more slightly raised the chances.        
1 Apr 2012 at 1:28pm
Radiation may up breast cancer risk in some women
Mammograms might raise the chances of developing cancer in young women whose genes put them at higher risk, a study suggests.        
6 Sep 2012 at 6:30pm
U.N.: Chemicals damaging health and environment
The report by the U.N. Environment Program warned that the increasing production of chemicals is increasing health costs.        
6 Sep 2012 at 11:25am
Study: Ginkgo doesn't prevent Alzheimer's disease
Taking ginkgo biloba didn't prevent Alzheimer's disease in older adults, according to the biggest prevention study in Europe.       
5 Sep 2012 at 10:34pm
University pulls Kinsey Institute app over privacy concerns
The Kinsey Institute released a new mobile app that allows users to report on sexual behavior and experiences.       
5 Sep 2012 at 9:43pm
War might be making young bodies old
A VA study finds that veterans in their 20s and 30s show signs of premature aging.       
5 Sep 2012 at 5:56pm
Report finds link between daily glass of alcohol and breast cancer
The report reviewed data on more than 12 million women from dozens of studies conducted around the world and found that just one small glass of wine, beer or other alcohol daily was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Dr. Jon Lapook reports.
24 May 2017 at 12:46am
Study: Breast cancer risk increases with even one drink
New report on breast cancer prevention dives into other lifestyle factors, too
22 May 2017 at 7:56pm
?Overweight kids face higher depression risk later
Ask your child if he or she is being bullied or "fat-shamed" at school, one expert advises parents
22 May 2017 at 1:57pm
Medigap supplemental coverage can be too pricey for younger Medicare benefici...
One night three years ago, Joe Hobson finished reading a book, went to sleep and woke up blind. The problem, caused by a rare hereditary disease, forced him to give up his 20-year communications job, along with its generous health insurance. Now 63, the Arlington man is covered by Medicare, the f...
7 Mar 2011 at 6:32pm
Type 2 diabetes surges in people younger than 20
U.S. cases in those under 20 have grown from almost zero to tens of thousands in just over a decade.
22 Mar 2011 at 3:48pm
Fear is potent risk of Japanese nuclear crisis
The psychological impact of Japanese nuclear crisis could turn out to be significant
15 Mar 2011 at 5:31am
How men and women exercise differently
No one wants to think she's a cliche. But it's time for me to recognize that when it comes to my gym behavior, that's exactly what I am: a cardio-loving woman who has to be forced to hoist a dumbbell.
1 Mar 2011 at 11:59am
Many Americans have poor health literacy
An elderly woman sent home from the hospital develops a life-threatening infection because she doesn't understand the warning signs listed in the discharge instructions. A man flummoxed by an intake form in a doctor's office reflexively writes "no" to every question because he doesn't understand ...
28 Feb 2011 at 8:37pm
'Policy Review' essay covers PTSD; veteran benefits
How could a Veterans Administration rule making it easier for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to file disability claims be a bad thing? In a "Policy Review" essay called "PTSD's Diagnostic Trap," psychiatrist and Yale University School of Medicine lecturer Sally Satel argues that ful...
21 Feb 2011 at 11:47am
Women are more likely than men to give up sleep to care for children and others
Call it the real night shift - that noctural period when bleary-eyed adults leave warm beds to tend to the needs of sick kids, elderly parents, an ailing spouse or incontinent pet. So, who takes the night shift: Mom or Dad?
14 Feb 2011 at 8:22pm
Enrollment in high-risk insurance pools lagging behind predictions
More Americans have been signing up for special health plans designed for people with medical problems that caused them to be spurned by the insurance industry, according to new government figures. But enrollment continues to lag significantly behind original predictions.
10 Feb 2011 at 9:35pm
Babies Don't Need Juice, Pediatricians Say
Babies do not need fruit juice and older kids need to watch it, pediatricians said Monday.
22 May 2017 at 12:02pm

[CaRP] XML error: > required at line 25
Why Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Eating chocolate may lower the risk for atrial fibrillation, the irregular heartbeat that can lead to stroke and heart failure.
23 May 2017 at 6:30pm
Warmer Weather Brings More Infections After Surgery
The risk of developing an infection at the site of a surgical wound increases during the summer months.
23 May 2017 at 12:45pm
The New Old Age: Planning to Age in Place? Find a Contractor Now
Virtually all single-family homes lack features needed to accommodate aging owners? limitations. But there are specialists prepared to help fix that.
19 May 2017 at 1:17pm
Some Social Scientists Are Tired of Asking for Permission
New federal rules may make it easier for researchers to conduct behavioral experiments. Critics worry that academics cannot judge whether their studies are harmful.
22 May 2017 at 1:28pm
The Checkup: The Science of Adolescent Sleep
Sleep deprivation is linked to behavioral and mental health problems and car accident risk, experts say, and starting school later could help.
22 May 2017 at 6:00am
Traveling Abroad? Get a Measles Shot
Adult travelers who are not immune to measles risk bringing home a highly contagious and sometimes fatal disease.
18 May 2017 at 5:00am
F.D.A. Warns of Faulty Lead Testing in Children and Mothers
The concern is that certain blood tests may have underestimated blood lead levels, providing false reassurance about risk for lead exposure.
17 May 2017 at 6:31pm
Repulsive behavior in germinal centers
18 May 2017 at 1:28pm
Risky in the tropics
18 May 2017 at 1:28pm
High-harmonic generation in graphene enhanced by elliptically polarized light...

The electronic properties of graphene can give rise to a range of nonlinear optical responses. One of the most desirable nonlinear optical processes is high-harmonic generation (HHG) originating from coherent electron motion induced by an intense light field. Here, we report on the observation of up to ninth-order harmonics in graphene excited by mid-infrared laser pulses at room temperature. The HHG in graphene is enhanced by an elliptically polarized laser excitation, and the resultant harmoni...


18 May 2017 at 1:28pm
Bragg coherent diffractive imaging of single-grain defect dynamics in polycry...

Polycrystalline material properties depend on the distribution and interactions of their crystalline grains. In particular, grain boundaries and defects are crucial in determining their response to external stimuli. A long-standing challenge is thus to observe individual grains, defects, and strain dynamics inside functional materials. Here we report a technique capable of revealing grain heterogeneity, including strain fields and individual dislocations, that can be used under operando conditio...


18 May 2017 at 1:28pm
Higher predation risk for insect prey at low latitudes and elevations

Biotic interactions underlie ecosystem structure and function, but predicting interaction outcomes is difficult. We tested the hypothesis that biotic interaction strength increases toward the equator, using a global experiment with model caterpillars to measure predation risk. Across an 11,660-kilometer latitudinal gradient spanning six continents, we found increasing predation toward the equator, with a parallel pattern of increasing predation toward lower elevations. Patterns across both latit...


18 May 2017 at 1:28pm
A dedicated network for social interaction processing in the primate brain

Primate cognition requires interaction processing. Interactions can reveal otherwise hidden properties of intentional agents, such as thoughts and feelings, and of inanimate objects, such as mass and material. Where and how interaction analyses are implemented in the brain is unknown. Using whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging in macaque monkeys, we discovered a network centered in the medial and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex that is exclusively engaged in social interaction analy...


18 May 2017 at 1:28pm
Three-dimensional Ca2+ imaging advances understanding of astrocyte biology

Astrocyte communication is typically studied by two-dimensional calcium ion (Ca2+) imaging, but this method has not yielded conclusive data on the role of astrocytes in synaptic and vascular function. We developed a three-dimensional two-photon imaging approach and studied Ca2+ dynamics in entire astrocyte volumes, including during axon-astrocyte interactions. In both awake mice and brain slices, we found that Ca2+ activity in an individual astrocyte is scattered throughout the cell, largely com...


18 May 2017 at 1:28pm
Cut Calories, Lengthen Life Span?
Study found middle-aged adults who reduced their intake showed slower biological aging
22 May 2017 at 10:15am
No Fruit Juice Before Age 1, Pediatricians Say
Plus, they support limits for older kids and doing away with sippy cups for toddlers
22 May 2017 at 10:15am
Suicide by Insulin?
Self-harm and suicidal behavior may not always be obvious in people with diabetes
18 May 2017 at 8:15pm
Are Nuts Good Medicine for Colon Cancer Survivors?
Survival benefits seen when combined with healthy diet and exercise, researchers say
17 May 2017 at 6:15pm
'Healthy Obese' May Be a Myth
Higher risk for heart problems detected in new study
17 May 2017 at 10:15am
Risk of Pregnancy Complication May Rise with Temps
Extreme cold seems to reduce the chances; heat raises the odds, study suggests
15 May 2017 at 6:15pm
Timing of Menopause May Affect Heart Failure Risk
Women whose periods end early and those who never give birth seem at added risk, research suggests
15 May 2017 at 4:20pm
'Female Viagra' May Lift a Younger Woman's Libido
But a pill might not address all the issues facing women who've lost their sex drive, researcher says
14 May 2017 at 10:15am
Blood Thinners May Prevent Dementia With AFib
Even people with a low risk of stroke could benefit, researchers say
12 May 2017 at 6:15pm

[CaRP] php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known (0)
Molecule induces lifesaving sleep in worms
Sometimes, a nematode worm just needs to take a nap. In fact, its life may depend on it. New research has identified a protein that promotes a sleep-like state in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Without the snooze-inducing molecule, worms are more likely to die when confronted with stressful conditions.
7 Mar 2016 at 10:57am
Group identifications affect likelihood of teenagers smoking, drinking and ta...
Teenagers who interact positively with their family, school and friends are far less likely to smoke, binge drink and use cannabis than peers who fail to identify with these social groups, according to research. The research team surveyed more than 1000 high school pupils aged 13-17 from the Fife area. The results showed that group identification protects against adverse health behavior, with levels of identification with family, school and friendship groups predicting the likelihood of teenager...
7 Mar 2016 at 9:36am
Goldilocks had it right: When it comes to sleep, neither too much or too litt...
Too much or too little sleep is linked with an increased risk of certain types of cardiovascular disease. Women and the elderly are particularly at risk, report scientists in a new report.
7 Mar 2016 at 9:36am
Technology to analyze customer behavior in stores
Proximus has developed technology for creating a map of how we shop in the supermarket thanks to a chip that is built into shopping carts and baskets.
7 Mar 2016 at 9:35am
Time to rethink your vegetable oil?
Risk of heart disease and diabetes may be lowered by a diet higher in a lipid found in grapeseed and other oils, but not in olive oil, a new study suggests. This finding could have obvious implications in preventing heart disease and diabetes, but also could be important for older adults because higher lean body mass can contribute to a longer life with more independence.
7 Mar 2016 at 9:23am
Young baseball players could benefit from preseason arm injury prevention pro...
Preseason prevention programs are beneficial to young baseball pitchers, according to new research. The study, the first to analyze a well-monitored preseason training program, showed numerous arm flexibility and strength improvements in participating athletes that could ultimately diminish the risk of injuries.
5 Mar 2016 at 11:18am
Latin dancing may have health benefits for older adults
A Latin dance program was more effective than health education alone in boosting older Latinos' physical fitness. After four months of dancing, participants were able to complete a 400-meter walk faster and increased their leisure physical activity level.
4 Mar 2016 at 9:57pm
Does a 'Western diet' increase risk of Alzheimer's disease?
New research provides insight into the role of the western diet in Alzheimer?s disease.
4 Mar 2016 at 4:48pm
Woodpecker drumming signals wimp or warrior
Instead of a distinctive song, woodpeckers bang on trees with their bills to create a sound called drumming. In a new study, researchers tested how woodpecker pairs perceived drumming to see how it influenced territorial interaction and coordination of defensive behavior.
4 Mar 2016 at 4:36pm
Marine protected areas intensify both cooperation and competition
Marine protected areas generate both extreme cooperation and extreme competition among commercial fishers. When these behaviors remain in balance, they can lead to better conservation of marine resources, a new study finds. However, if competition among fishers increases while cooperation declines, it could threaten the long-term survival of marine protected areas, their biodiversity and the communities that depend on them.
4 Mar 2016 at 4:04pm
Eating peanut in early years helps reduce risk of allergy even with later abs...
The early introduction of peanut to the diets of infants at high-risk of developing peanut allergy significantly reduces the risk of peanut allergy until 6 years of age, even if they stop eating peanut around the age of five, according to a new study.
4 Mar 2016 at 4:04pm

[CaRP] php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known (0)
The brain starts to eat itself after chronic sleep deprivation
Sleep loss in mice sends the brain?s immune cells into overdrive. This might be helpful in the short term, but could increase the risk of dementia in the long run
23 May 2017 at 6:00pm
Hopping miniature parrots suggest how birds first got airborne
Parrotlets save energy when foraging by jumping from perch to perch with a few wingbeats, a technique that might have predated true flight
19 May 2017 at 1:15pm
What vision of doom made Hawking seek a faster Earth exit plan?
Stephen Hawking now says humanity must colonise other worlds within a century, rather than 1000 years, to ensure survival. Why the rush, asks Dirk Schulze-Makuch
15 May 2017 at 12:30pm
Wish you had a shorter workday? Here?s why that?s a bad idea
There?s nothing like a bank holiday to make you wish you worked less, and productivity researchers are starting to agree. But reduced hours might add to your stress
11 May 2017 at 12:40pm
A little cannabis every day might keep brain ageing at bay
A mouse study suggests marijuana may have the opposite effect on older people than it has on the young, boosting learning and memory instead of impairing it
10 May 2017 at 11:30am
Captive breeding is a final roll of the dice for the vaquita
The decline of the rare porpoise has brought us to the cusp of a risky project to put the animals in a sanctuary. Will it be enough, wonders Olive Heffernan
9 May 2017 at 7:09am
6 Ways To Reduce Dementia Risk, From Quitting Smoking To Staying Active, Acco...
According to a physician, here are some steps you can take to reduce your risk of dementia as you age.
23 May 2017 at 4:08pm
How Much Alcohol A Day May Be Enough To Increase Breast Cancer Risk, Accordin...
New research has found just how much alcohol it takes to increase your overall risk of developing breast cancer.
23 May 2017 at 12:00am
Older Women's Infertility May Be Caused By A Protein Called Securin, Study Co...
Australian researchers explored why older women have a greater chance of miscarriage and having a baby with birth defects.
20 May 2017 at 5:07pm
If You Want To Reduce Your Risk Of Breast Cancer, Reduce Overall Body Fat, No...
New study indicates having a flat belly won't reduce breast cancer risk.
19 May 2017 at 3:02pm

[CaRP] php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known (0)
School Safety Tips For Younger Kids
School is back in session, so take some time to go over these important safety tips with your children. This is just the beginning of the conversation, but it's a great place to get started.
21 Jul 2014 at 8:00am
Cut Calories, Lengthen Life Span?
Study found middle-aged adults who reduced their intake showed slower biological aging
22 May 2017 at 10:15am
No Fruit Juice Before Age 1, Pediatricians Say
Plus, they support limits for older kids and doing away with sippy cups for toddlers
22 May 2017 at 10:15am
Suicide by Insulin?
Self-harm and suicidal behavior may not always be obvious in people with diabetes
18 May 2017 at 8:15pm
Are Nuts Good Medicine for Colon Cancer Survivors?
Survival benefits seen when combined with healthy diet and exercise, researchers say
17 May 2017 at 6:15pm
'Healthy Obese' May Be a Myth
Higher risk for heart problems detected in new study
17 May 2017 at 10:15am
Risk of Pregnancy Complication May Rise with Temps
Extreme cold seems to reduce the chances; heat raises the odds, study suggests
15 May 2017 at 6:15pm
Timing of Menopause May Affect Heart Failure Risk
Women whose periods end early and those who never give birth seem at added risk, research suggests
15 May 2017 at 4:20pm
'Female Viagra' May Lift a Younger Woman's Libido
But a pill might not address all the issues facing women who've lost their sex drive, researcher says
14 May 2017 at 10:15am
Blood Thinners May Prevent Dementia With AFib
Even people with a low risk of stroke could benefit, researchers say
12 May 2017 at 6:15pm
Medigap supplemental coverage can be too pricey for younger Medicare benefici...
One night three years ago, Joe Hobson finished reading a book, went to sleep and woke up blind. The problem, caused by a rare hereditary disease, forced him to give up his 20-year communications job, along with its generous health insurance. Now 63, the Arlington man is covered by Medicare, the f...
7 Mar 2011 at 6:32pm
Type 2 diabetes surges in people younger than 20
U.S. cases in those under 20 have grown from almost zero to tens of thousands in just over a decade.
22 Mar 2011 at 3:48pm
Fear is potent risk of Japanese nuclear crisis
The psychological impact of Japanese nuclear crisis could turn out to be significant
15 Mar 2011 at 5:31am
How men and women exercise differently
No one wants to think she's a cliche. But it's time for me to recognize that when it comes to my gym behavior, that's exactly what I am: a cardio-loving woman who has to be forced to hoist a dumbbell.
1 Mar 2011 at 11:59am
Many Americans have poor health literacy
An elderly woman sent home from the hospital develops a life-threatening infection because she doesn't understand the warning signs listed in the discharge instructions. A man flummoxed by an intake form in a doctor's office reflexively writes "no" to every question because he doesn't understand ...
28 Feb 2011 at 8:37pm
'Policy Review' essay covers PTSD; veteran benefits
How could a Veterans Administration rule making it easier for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to file disability claims be a bad thing? In a "Policy Review" essay called "PTSD's Diagnostic Trap," psychiatrist and Yale University School of Medicine lecturer Sally Satel argues that ful...
21 Feb 2011 at 11:47am
Women are more likely than men to give up sleep to care for children and others
Call it the real night shift - that noctural period when bleary-eyed adults leave warm beds to tend to the needs of sick kids, elderly parents, an ailing spouse or incontinent pet. So, who takes the night shift: Mom or Dad?
14 Feb 2011 at 8:22pm
Enrollment in high-risk insurance pools lagging behind predictions
More Americans have been signing up for special health plans designed for people with medical problems that caused them to be spurned by the insurance industry, according to new government figures. But enrollment continues to lag significantly behind original predictions.
10 Feb 2011 at 9:35pm

[CaRP] php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known (0)
Some Social Scientists Are Tired of Asking for Permission
New federal rules may make it easier for researchers to conduct behavioral experiments. Critics worry that academics cannot judge whether their studies are harmful.
22 May 2017 at 1:28pm
The hot new thing? Infrared saunas. Three L.A. places to try out the trend

With ever more studies pointing to the benefits of sweating ? from increased longevity and athletic endurance to decreased pain and anxiety ? Sauna 2.0 led this year?s trend report from the Global Wellness Summit.

One of the breakout sessions for the 500 or so doctors, spa directors, hospitality...


18 May 2017 at 6:00pm
That moment you realize you can't work out like you used to ...

As I near the half-century mark, I find there are more exercises that I physically cannot do.

Mentally, however, what I can?t do is stop being active.

Aging requires adaptations.

When we were young, we felt bulletproof and pushing through pain was rarely problematic. Our youthful bodies healed...


6 May 2017 at 9:00am
Lululemon Athletica uses science to reinvent the sports bra

When it comes to sports bras, the longstanding idea was to keep breast movement to a minimum during exercise, but Lululemon is turning that notion on its head.

After two years of development, incorporating everything from advancements in neuroscience to behavioral psychology, the activewear firm...


2 May 2017 at 2:15pm
Rising sea levels could mean twice as much flood risk in Los Angeles and othe...

The effects of rising oceans on coastal flooding may be even worse than we thought. Scientists have found that a mere 10 to 20 centimeters of sea-level rise ? which is expected by 2050 ? will more than double the frequency of serious flooding events in many parts of the globe, including along the...


18 May 2017 at 8:00pm
This is your brain on ... the modern world

Our Western diet is famously bad for the circulatory system, but for a long time, people thought the damage stopped there. Then around 10 years ago, Terry Davidson, a behavioral neuroscientist, wondered whether our modern eating habits might also affect our brains.

To test it out, he fed lab rats...


18 May 2017 at 9:00am

NIH Press Releases



[CaRP] php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known (0)
NIH News Release
NIH News Release
News releases from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Affective neuroscience expert Dr. Richard Davidson to speak on meditation res...
20 Apr 2016 at 1:00pm
NCCIH presents ?Change Your Brain by Transforming Your Mind?.


NIH study finds factors that may influence influenza vaccine effectiveness
19 Apr 2016 at 8:30pm
Long-held approach to predicting seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness may need to be revisited.


Statement on Review of NIH Sterile Production Facilities
19 Apr 2016 at 8:15pm
Production suspended in two facilities.


NCI opens online platform to submit ideas about research for Cancer Moonshot
18 Apr 2016 at 8:15pm
Submissions will be considered by a panel of scientific experts and patient advocates.


Healthy diet may reduce high blood pressure risk after gestational diabetes, ...
18 Apr 2016 at 8:00pm
Women who have had gestational diabetes may indeed benefit from a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.


NIH launches research program to reduce health disparities in surgical outcomes
18 Apr 2016 at 3:00pm
The initiative will involve collaborations among several NIH institutes and centers, AHRQ.


Islet transplantation restores blood sugar awareness and control in type 1 di...
18 Apr 2016 at 2:00pm
NIH-funded study lays groundwork for potential application submission to FDA for licensure of islet preparation.


Greenness around homes linked to lower mortality
15 Apr 2016 at 4:00pm
Researchers found the biggest differences in death rates from kidney disease, respiratory disease, and cancer.


NIH sequences genome of a fungus that causes life-threatening pneumonia
11 Apr 2016 at 3:00pm
Pneumocystis was one of the first infections that led to the initial recognition of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.


New role identified for scars at the site of injured spinal cord
7 Apr 2016 at 7:00pm
NIH-funded mouse study suggests scar formation may help, not hinder, nerve regrowth.


NIH Announcements


[CaRP] php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known (0)
NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA)
Weekly Funding Opportunities and Policy Notices from the National Institutes of Health.

Notice of Intent to Publish a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Conformanc...
12 Dec 2016 at 11:52am
Notice NOT-FD-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Reminder: NHLBI FY2017 Small Business Topics of Special Interest (TOSI) for t...
12 Dec 2016 at 11:48am
Notice NOT-HL-16-479 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Notice of Extension of the Expiration Date for PA-16-282 Developing New Clini...
12 Dec 2016 at 1:25am
Notice NOT-HS-17-005 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Notice of an Informational Webinar for RFA-NS-17-017 "Frontotemporal Degenera...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:09am
Notice NOT-NS-17-010 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory - Pragmatic Clinical Trials Demonstr...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:33am
Funding Opportunity RFA-AT-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this FOA is to solicit UG3/UH3 phased cooperative agreement research applications to conduct efficient, large-scale pragmatic clinical trial Demonstration Projects within the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and other co-morbid conditions in U.S. military personnel, veterans and their families. This program will be referred to as the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory program. Awards made under this FOA will initially support a two-year milestone-driven planning phase (UG3), with possible transition to a pragmatic trial Demonstration Project implementation phase (UH3). UG3 projects that have met the scientific milestone and feasibility requirements may transition to the UH3 phase. The UG3/UH3 application must be submitted as a single application, following the instructions described in this FOA. The overall goal of this initiative, jointly supported by the NIH, DoD, and VA, is to develop the capacity to implement cost-effective large-scale clinical research in military and veteran health care delivery organizations focusing on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and other comorbid conditions. The NIH, DoD, and VA expect to: establish a Coordinating Center that will provide national leadership and technical expertise for all aspects of health care system (HCS_- focused research including assistance to UG3/UH3 grant applicants. Primary outcomes of treatment interventions include assessing pain and pain reduction, ability to function in daily life, quality of life, and medication usage/reduction/discontinuation. Secondary outcomes focusing on assessing comorbid conditions or those co-occurring with high frequency in this population are also of interest under the FOA.
NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory - Coordinating Center (U24)
12 Dec 2016 at 3:33am
Funding Opportunity RFA-AT-17-002 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this FOA is to solicit applications for a Coordinating Center (CC) to provide national leadership for the NIH-DoD-VA Health Care Systems (HCS) Research Collaboratory program on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and comorbidities in U.S. military personnel, veterans and their families. For brevity, this initiative will be referred to as the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory. Coordinating Center applicants will need to: 1) develop, adapt, and adopt technical and policy guidelines and best practices for the effective conduct of research in partnership with health care systems focused on military personnel, veterans, and their families; 2) work collaboratively with and provide technical, design, and other support to Demonstration Project teams, to develop and implement a pragmatic trial protocol; and 3) disseminate widely Collaboratory-endorsed policies and best practices and lessons learned in the Demonstration Projects for implementing research within health care settings. The Coordinating Center will also serve as the central resource for the activities of the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory program, including providing administrative support for a Steering Committee and its subcommittees.
Innovations for Healthy Living - Improving Population Health and Eliminating ...
12 Dec 2016 at 12:04pm
Funding Opportunity RFA-MD-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant applications that propose to develop a product, process or service for commercialization with the aim of reducing disparities in healthcare access and health outcomes and in preventing disease and improving health in one or more NIH-defined health disparity population group(s). Appropriate technologies should be effective, affordable, culturally acceptable, and deliverable to racial/ethnic minorities, low-income and rural populations.
Technologies for Improving Minority Health and Eliminating Health Disparities...
12 Dec 2016 at 12:04pm
Funding Opportunity RFA-MD-17-002 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant applications that propose to develop a product, process or service for commercialization with the aim of reducing disparities in healthcare access and health outcomes in one or more NIH-defined health disparity population group(s). Appropriate technologies should be effective, affordable, culturally acceptable, and deliverable to racial/ethnic minorities, low-income and rural populations.
Novel Analytical Approaches for Metabolomics Data (R03)
12 Dec 2016 at 9:57am
Funding Opportunity RFA-RM-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this small research grant Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to foster collaboration between computational scientists, metabolomics experts, and biomedical researchers in developing, piloting, and/or validating novel bioinformatic approaches that address current analytical hurdles in metabolomics data. A goal of providing powerful approaches that will be useful to biomedical researchers, as well as bioinformaticians, is particularly encouraged. Projects are not intended to supplement ongoing metabolomics analyses, but to provide a tool for broader use by the biomedical research community. Projects are expected to use existing, publicly available metabolomics data and complement the efforts and resources of the Common Fund Metabolomics Program.
Utilizing Health Information Technology to Scale and Spread Successful Practi...
12 Dec 2016 at 10:39am
Funding Opportunity PA-17-077 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites R18 grant applications for research that demonstrates how health information technology (IT) can improve patient-centered health outcomes and quality of care in primary care and other ambulatory settings through the scale and spread of successful, health IT-enabled practice models that use patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures to achieve these objectives.
Administrative Supplement for Research on Sex/Gender Influences (Admin Supp)
12 Dec 2016 at 1:27am
Funding Opportunity PA-17-078 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) announces the availability of administrative supplements to support research highlighting the impact of sex/gender influences and/or sex and gender factors in human health and illness, including basic, preclinical, clinical and behavioral studies. Of special interest are studies relevant to understanding the significance of biological sex on cells and tissue explants; comparative studies of male and female tissues, organ systems and physiological systems; sex-based comparisons of pathophysiology, biomarkers, gene expression, clinical presentation and prevention and treatment of diseases. The most robust experimental designs include consideration of both sex and gender; therefore, applications proposing to investigate the influence of both sex and gender factors are highly encouraged. The proposed research must address at least one objective from Goals 1 through 3 of the NIH Strategic Plan for Women's Health Research.
Shared Instrumentation Grant (SIG) Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 10:19am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-074 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Shared Instrument Grant (SIG) Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems that cost at least $50,000. There is no maximum price requirement; however, the maximum award is $600,000. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffractometers, mass and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and light microscopes, cell sorters, and biomedical imagers.
Shared Instrumentation for Animal Research (SIFAR) Grant Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 11:23am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-075 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Shared Instrumentation for Animal Research (SIFAR) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-funded investigators to purchase or upgrade scientific instruments necessary to carry out animal experiments in all areas of biomedical research supported by the NIH. Applicants may request clusters of commercially available instruments configured as specialized integrated systems or as series of instruments to support a thematic workflow in a well-defined area of research using animals or related materials. Priority will be given to specialized clusters of instruments and to uniquely configured systems to support innovative and potentially transformative investigations. Requests for a single instrument will be considered only if the instrument is to be placed in a barrier facility. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) supports requests for state-of-the art commercially available technologies needed for NIH-funded research using any vertebrate and invertebrate animal species. It is expected that the use of the awarded instruments will enhance the scientific rigor of animal research and improve the reproducibility of experimental outcomes. One item of the requested instrumentation must cost at least $50,000. No instrument in a cluster can cost less than $20,000. There is no maximum price requirement; however, the maximum award is $750,000.
High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 12:15pm
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-076 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems that cost at least $600,001. The maximum award is $2,000,000. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffraction systems, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and confocal microscopes, cell-sorters, and biomedical imagers.
Increasing the Use of Medications for the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorders ...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:26am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-079 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages health services research designed to increase the public health impact of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmacotherapies for the treatment of alcohol use disorder. Significant progress is needed in developing generalizable, scalable, cost-effective strategies to move these evidence-based interventions into the mainstream of alcohol use disorder treatment, in both general medical and specialty care settings. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) seeks applications to conduct hypothesis-driven research to identify effective methods for increasing the utilization of currently-available medications, by addressing their acceptability (to prescribers and patients), perceived effectiveness, affordability, and feasibility of use within existing care delivery systems.